• NYC MTA Congestion Pricing Effects on NYCT, NJT, MNRR, and LIRR

  • This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.
This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by ExCon90
 
Looks like it'a time for those learned in the law to examine the enabling legislation to see whether it specifically grants the governor the authority to overrule decisions of the board.
  by eolesen
 
If the board serves at the Governor's appointment, can they be removed by the Governor?....

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  by Nasadowsk
 
1) TransCore probably gets their money

2) Probably, since the alternative business tax hike is DOA.

Maybe it’s on pause. I suspect it’ll be a pretty long pause…
  by MACTRAXX
 
Everyone - Let's add these posts to where they should be and lock or delete this redundant topic - MACTRAXX
  by MACTRAXX
 
CX - The discount that the MTA mentioned is 10 percent off monthly ticket fares to LIRR zones 1 and 3
(Queens and Brooklyn LIRR Stations) and MNCR Zone 2 (Bronx stations) within the City of New York...

This Wikipedia page about Manhattan Congestion Pricing is very informative (Thanks again, Allan)
especially now with the decision to indefinitely postpone implementation from the original start
date of June 30, 2024 by NY Governor Hochul:

https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Congestion_p ... _York_City

MACTRAXX
  by Commuter X
 
Any guesses how long Janno Lieber sticks around?

My guess is he will be gone by the end of this month. Definitely by the end of this year
  by Allan
 
eolesen wrote: Fri Jun 07, 2024 12:57 am If the board serves at the Governor's appointment, can they be removed by the Governor?....

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Here is the breakdown (I am coping from Wiki rather than typing it all out):

"The MTA is governed by a 21-member board representing the 5 boroughs of New York City, each of the counties in its New York State service area, and worker and rider interest groups. Of these, there are 14 voting members, broken down into 13 board members who cast individual votes, 4 board members who cast a single collective vote, and 6 group representatives who do not vote

Five members as well as the chairman/CEO are directly nominated by the Governor of New York, while four are recommended by New York City's mayor. The county executives of Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties nominate one member each. Each of these members has one vote.] The county executives of Dutchess, Orange, Rockland, and Putnam counties also nominate one member each,] but these members cast one collective vote.[62] The Board has six rotating nonvoting seats held by representatives of MTA employee organized labor and the Permanent Citizens Advisory Committee, which represent customers of MTA transit and commuter facilities.] Board members are confirmed by the New York State Senate."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropoli ... _Authority
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So to answer your question - The Governor can remove only the Chairman and the 5 board member that he or she appointed.
  by Head-end View
 
I'm inclined to agree. He probably feels that she sold out him and the MTA.
  by eolesen
 
The Assembly/Senate leadership have nixed the commuter tax per the Post.

The Post's editorial board suggested MTA not invest in electric buses they cant afford, and to fix some of the ongoing wasteful business practices e.g. $1.4B in overtime in 2023. Fixing that by just 20% would go a lot farther than what the congestion tax would raise.

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  by eolesen
 
Also, a chunk of that $507 was the ongoing maintenance contract for the cameras. No operations, no maintenance...

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  by eolesen
 
Well, that's almost half the votes needed to make her priorities happen. I can't imagine all of the Mayor's appointees were onboard with it, nor would the outlying county reps.

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  by Jeff Smith
 
Opinion: NY Post via MSN
Calm down, the MTA won’t collapse without congestion pricing

Gov. Hochul’s cancellation of congestion pricing weeks before its start has thrown the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority into a crisis that requires an immediate solution: She must either reverse course or enact a huge new tax.

Or so the transit advocates would have you think.
...
The 2019 law directed the MTA to create a congestion-toll plan, with the opposite of a deadline: the MTA couldn’t start the program “earlier than December 31, 2020.”

That could have meant January 1, 2021, or June 30, 2024, the date the MTA had announced, or April 2, 2082.
....
But the MTA has other options.

For example, it long ago said it would borrow $17.4 billion against other sources of revenue — and it’s borrowed only $6.3 billion of that amount.

In addition, the state long ago promised $3.1 billion in direct funding, outside of congestion pricing — and it’s only delivered $511 million of it.
...
  by Jeff Smith
 
Priorities: Gothamist
MTA says it will focus on 'most basic and urgent needs' after Hochul's congestion pricing flip-flop
...
In the agency’s first public comments since Hochul’s Wednesday announcement, MTA officials said the board would have to reassess where its funding should best be allocated.

“Modernization and improvement projects like electric buses, accessible (ADA) stations and new signals will likely need to be deprioritized to protect and preserve the basic operation and functionality of this 100+ year old system,” MTA Chief Financial Officer Kevin Willens and General Counsel Paige Graves said in a joint statement.
...
Albany lawmakers left the Capitol early Saturday morning without identifying an immediate funding source to make up for the shortfall Hochul’s decision creates. The $15 toll meant to be levied on drivers in Manhattan’s central business district would have allowed the MTA to issue an expected $15 billion in bonds against the revenue stream. Agency officials said without that funding source it would have to devote scarce funds to the “most basic and urgent needs.”
...
“Under applicable federal law and regulation, the MTA cannot act until the Central Business District Tolling Program is approved by New York State, New York City and the federal government — and with the announcement of the pause, we no longer have the State’s consent,” the officials said.
...
  by daybeers
 
eolesen wrote: Thu May 23, 2024 11:00 pm Let's not forget that at a time where some companies are still struggling to coerce people back to the office (and the City really needing those people to be spending money in the City), the City is now providing more justification for those employees to stay home.
If $15 per day is going to push those who are able to work from home to do so, the program is working.

Keep in mind, south of 60th Street.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Here is The Times article and a Fair Use quotation therefrom that Mr. Volpini attempted to share with the Forum on June 6:
Gov. Kathy Hochul of New York announced on Wednesday that she was shelving the long-awaited tolling plan known as congestion pricing, just weeks before it was to go into effect.

“After careful consideration I have come to the difficult decision that implementing the planned congestion pricing system risks too many unintended consequences,” Ms. Hochul said, adding: “I have directed the M.T.A. to indefinitely pause the program.”

The move angered environmentalists, transit advocates and economists, with some accusing the governor of abandoning a plan that was decades in the making for political reasons in a critical election year.

The decision, Ms. Hochul acknowledged, was not an easy one, but she said it was nonetheless crucial in light of the lingering effects of the coronavirus pandemic on working families and New York City’s economy.
I'm still astounded she took this action; again, she doesn't face the voters until 2026, and those in New York City dodging the array of delivery vehicles that have piled their stuff on the sidewalks have long memories.

All I saw of NYC this past journey was what's visible from George's upper level. I didn't get into town, as I had enough to keep me occupied, as well as parting with $$$$, at both SKS (you can be sure that the Director of Alumni Affairs - a gal I really "love" by the way - was of the "Come on Gil, break out the checkbook") and then with my Sister and Nephew in Greenwich.
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