• NJT ALP-45-DP Supplemental Order

  • Discussion related to New Jersey Transit rail and light rail operations.
Discussion related to New Jersey Transit rail and light rail operations.

Moderators: lensovet, Kaback9, nick11a

  • 95 posts
  • 1
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  by Jeff Smith
 
https://www.njtransit.com/press-release ... ocomotives

Full Press Release:

GOVERNOR MURPHY MARKS BEGINNING OF TESTING FOR NJ TRANSIT DUAL-POWER LOCOMOTIVES
First of 25 New Locomotives Prepares for Entry into Service, Increasing Mechanical Reliability and Operational Flexibility
April 6, 2021

NEWARK – Governor Murphy, NJ TRANSIT Chair Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti, NJ TRANSIT President & CEO Kevin Corbett, and local officials today marked the beginning of testing of the first of 25 new ALP-45 dual-power locomotives manufactured by Alstom during a ceremony that was held on Track A at Newark Penn Station.

“Since day one, our administration has been committed to building a better, more reliable, and sustainable NJ TRANSIT,” said Governor Murphy. “This locomotive is the first of 25 that will reinvigorate the NJ TRANSIT fleet with new, environmentally-friendly equipment. New Jersey commuters deserve only the best, and that is what we are delivering to them today.”

“These new dual-power locomotives deliver on Governor Murphy’s commitment to make capital investments in NJ TRANSIT, improve service reliability, and improve the environment,” said NJDOT Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Chair Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti. “They produce zero emissions when running on electric power and have fewer emissions when running on diesel power then the all-diesel locomotives they are replacing.”

“This is a proud moment for NJ TRANSIT and for New Jersey,” said NJ TRANSIT President & CEO Kevin Corbett. “It represents the first tangible evidence of a process we started three years ago to renew our entire rail fleet. One new dual-power locomotive is here today, but more are arriving this year through early next year, and eight more are on order. In just two years, we begin taking delivery of 113 new self-propelled multilevel rail cars to replace the 40-year-old plus Arrow III cars, and all of these new locomotives and rail cars promise to significantly improve service and reliability for our customers.”

The locomotives will meet the current EPA Tier IV requirements, the most rigorous air quality standard to date for new locomotives, reducing emissions compared to the locomotives to be replaced when operating in diesel mode, and producing zero emissions when operating in electric mode. The ALP-45s offer a significant increase in horsepower, acceleration and available head-end power. The ALP-45 locomotives are designed to operate push-pull passenger train service on both electrified and non-electrified lines at speeds of up to 125 mph in electric mode and up to 100 mph in diesel mode.

The locomotives will undergo dynamic qualification and acceptance testing for about six weeks, at which time they will be prepared to enter revenue service.
  by amtrakowitz
 
Any reason why Murphy's getting involved personally?
  by R&DB
 
“They produce zero emissions when running on electric power and have fewer emissions when running on diesel power then the all-diesel locomotives they are replacing.”
Do the power plants that produce the electricity have zero emissions?
  by lensovet
 
R&DB wrote: Fri Apr 09, 2021 5:39 am
“They produce zero emissions when running on electric power and have fewer emissions when running on diesel power then the all-diesel locomotives they are replacing.”
Do the power plants that produce the electricity have zero emissions?
The thing about power plants is that their emissions decrease over time as older plants are retired and newer/renewable plants are brought up. NJRPS requires that 21% of electricity sold in 2021 come from renewables. The majority of electricity in NJ comes from nuclear, which is also emissions-free.

A diesel engine, on the other hand, will only produce more emissions with age. It also pollutes throughout its entire route, unlike a natural gas-fired power plant which produces emissions at a single source (and those emissions are much cleaner than diesel fuel combustion).
  by Ken W2KB
 
R&DB wrote: Fri Apr 09, 2021 5:39 am
“They produce zero emissions when running on electric power and have fewer emissions when running on diesel power then the all-diesel locomotives they are replacing.”
Do the power plants that produce the electricity have zero emissions?
The PJM Interconnection does have a high percentage of its energy produced by nuclear power generating stations, and some by hydroelectric, both of which are zero emission sources. There is also a very high percentage from lower emission natural gas combined cycle units. So the statement is partially correct from that perspective.
  by pumpers
 
Not a huge player today but already surprisingly large (to me) and growing fast is solar cells (located in NJ). Looking at Kilowatt-hours on an annual basis, I think it already provides ~5% of NJ's total electric use. In the top 10 in the US.
EDIT: The chart that Kitchin linked to is for the month of December only, I believe. The worst month of the year for solar.
I don't think hydro is more than ~ 1%, but nuclear power is in the 50% range. So that's well over 50% with no emissions already today.
Nearly all of the rest now is gas as Ken wrote. As solar keeps growing and then they start building offshore wind, I think in 10 years it will be close to 2/3 with no emissions. Hard to believe NJ is a leader in the "Environment" category, in the positive sense.
Jim S
  by OportRailfan
 
R&DB wrote: Fri Apr 09, 2021 5:39 am Do the power plants that produce the electricity have zero emissions?
Yes.
Last edited by nomis on Thu May 20, 2021 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total. Reason: Unnecessary quoting
  by amtrakowitz
 
Seriously? :-D I think we all know the real answer is in the negative. Even hydroelectric plants produce water vapor and ozone (IIRC), never mind particulates from wear and tear of turbines.
Last edited by nomis on Thu May 20, 2021 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total. Reason: Unnecessary quoting
  by ElectricTraction
 
They already have too many of the ALP-45DPs, and now they're buying MORE of them? They are neat locomotives, but they really are a bespoke niche solution to trains into NYP from beyond electrified territory, or for runs that can use electric power for a significant portion of the run. They are really, really expensive and not terribly efficient diesels....
  by F40
 
In my opinion, they should only order enough ALP45 dual modes to the extent they will use them for truly dual mode service. They should consider procuring lighter and more efficient diesels like Amtrak is doing with the ALC42's and use them on the Hoboken division lines or on the ACL which will not see any electrification. Much rather have a fuel efficient diesel which meets Tier IV emission standards than dual modes belching diesel smoke because they are carrying around an entire generator they don't need as deadweight for much of their lifespan, not to mention the added fuel cost and cost of the units themselves.
  by CNJGeep
 
4536 went into service a few days ago.
  by Dcell
 
F40 wrote: Mon Aug 02, 2021 5:00 pm In my opinion, they should only order enough ALP45 dual modes to the extent they will use them for truly dual mode service. They should consider procuring lighter and more efficient diesels like Amtrak is doing with the ALC42's and use them on the Hoboken division lines or on the ACL which will not see any electrification. Much rather have a fuel efficient diesel which meets Tier IV emission standards than dual modes belching diesel smoke because they are carrying around an entire generator they don't need as deadweight for much of their lifespan, not to mention the added fuel cost and cost of the units themselves.
Won't the new ones be Tier 4 compliant? I don't get your belching smoke reference.
  by F40
 
Dcell wrote: Tue Aug 03, 2021 10:15 am
F40 wrote: Mon Aug 02, 2021 5:00 pm In my opinion, they should only order enough ALP45 dual modes to the extent they will use them for truly dual mode service. They should consider procuring lighter and more efficient diesels like Amtrak is doing with the ALC42's and use them on the Hoboken division lines or on the ACL which will not see any electrification. Much rather have a fuel efficient diesel which meets Tier IV emission standards than dual modes belching diesel smoke because they are carrying around an entire generator they don't need as deadweight for much of their lifespan, not to mention the added fuel cost and cost of the units themselves.
Won't the new ones be Tier 4 compliant? I don't get your belching smoke reference.
This was to illustrate the fuel guzzling of the ALP45's likened to a big SUV vs a modern diesel Loco to a light car.

Having driven both kinds of vehicles the SUV is not easy on your wallet, especially with oil prices these days.

Though with an SUV, you might argue you have more utility, more space for cargo and people. But not so with a locomotive, whose sole purpose is to pull train cars. The "operational flexibility" is not enough of a benefit to justify the added cost of purchasing more of them (how many heads is it and why does NJT always say they are strapped for cash?). This is ignoring the holes in the budget which add up. The Hoboken division train sets are never used on the NE Corridor so they are kept separate as they are. Why would locomotives be hard to designate? Is it because they do not want to make one more yard move? Otherwise, they would be sitting and still be on the clock.
  by ElectricTraction
 
F40 wrote: Tue Aug 03, 2021 4:22 pmThis was to illustrate the fuel guzzling of the ALP45's likened to a big SUV vs a modern diesel Loco to a light car.
And guzzle fuel the ALP45's do. Like most commuter and regional rail systems, most of the system should either be electrified, or run as DMU/HMU with a connection to the electrics. Port Jervis is the one area where dual modes would really make sense with the connection to the NEC and electrification from Suffern south.
  • 1
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7