• New Haven Rail Yard, 1960's

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by MNCRR9000
 
With the Connecticut Department of Transportation and Metro-North rebuilding the New Haven Rail Yard over the next ten years I am wondering if anyone has a diagram of what the rail yard looked like back during the New Haven Rail Yard era most likely during the early 60's. I am curious to see what it looked like back then and how it has changed over the years.

Thanks
  by Noel Weaver
 
The lay of the land hasn't changed much but the yard has changed so much that today you would not recognize the place. When I went through New Haven last August a couple of times it really looked different compared with my memories of the West End Passenger Yard of New Haven Railroad days. There was also an East End Passenger Yard just east of the station in New Haven Railroad days. It consisted of about 5 stub end tracks with ground steam and power and contained mostly coaches for a rear feed of through trains from Boston and Springfield enroute to New York. There was a yard engine assigned to this yard too mostly to handle the cars to and from trains west of New Haven.
During the 60's New Haven Station had a series of places where passenger cars were serviced and stored. East End, West End, Water Street and sometimes just in the station. Also tracks 11 and 13 west were used for trains sometimes. New Haven was good and busy then but it was sort of a different kind of busy than it is today. I looked at the operation for a few minutes from where I parked my car in the parking garage one morning and I was very impressed with what I was seeing.
Noel Weaver
  by MNCRR9000
 
Noel Weaver wrote:The lay of the land hasn't changed much but the yard has changed so much that today you would not recognize the place. When I went through New Haven last August a couple of times it really looked different compared with my memories of the West End Passenger Yard of New Haven Railroad days. There was also an East End Passenger Yard just east of the station in New Haven Railroad days. It consisted of about 5 stub end tracks with ground steam and power and contained mostly coaches for a rear feed of through trains from Boston and Springfield enroute to New York. There was a yard engine assigned to this yard too mostly to handle the cars to and from trains west of New Haven.
During the 60's New Haven Station had a series of places where passenger cars were serviced and stored. East End, West End, Water Street and sometimes just in the station. Also tracks 11 and 13 west were used for trains sometimes. New Haven was good and busy then but it was sort of a different kind of busy than it is today. I looked at the operation for a few minutes from where I parked my car in the parking garage one morning and I was very impressed with what I was seeing.
Noel Weaver
Thanks for the info Noel. Very interesting stuff. Did the New Haven Rail Yard also handle freight or was that mostly handled at the Cedar Hill Yard? Did the New Haven Rail Yard (NHRY) also have a good size locomotive shop?
  by Noel Weaver
 
There was freight at Water Street in the NHRR and into the Penn Central period. The Winchester Job worked the lower end of the Canal Line within yard limits as did the West Haven Job which worked the industries off tracks 3 and 4 in West Haven and both of these jobs worked out of Water Street. There was an old wooden building with a yardmaster on the second floor and a switch tender among others as well as a clerk or two. There was also a mail terminal over behind Water Street toward Brewery Street and this had an engine working it 24 hours a day, a Water Street Job called the Mail Engine. There were also other places that got cars of meat, perishables and other freight downtown all handled out of Water Street.
One has to wonder today just what happened to all that business today, most of the places just plain shut down and/or moved away.
Noel Weaver
  by MNCRR9000
 
Noel Weaver wrote:There was freight at Water Street in the NHRR and into the Penn Central period. The Winchester Job worked the lower end of the Canal Line within yard limits as did the West Haven Job which worked the industries off tracks 3 and 4 in West Haven and both of these jobs worked out of Water Street. There was an old wooden building with a yardmaster on the second floor and a switch tender among others as well as a clerk or two. There was also a mail terminal over behind Water Street toward Brewery Street and this had an engine working it 24 hours a day, a Water Street Job called the Mail Engine. There were also other places that got cars of meat, perishables and other freight downtown all handled out of Water Street.
One has to wonder today just what happened to all that business today, most of the places just plain shut down and/or moved away.
Noel Weaver
Sounds like the New Haven Rail Yard really had an interesting history. It definietly does kind of make you wonder where all of those businesses went and its kind of sad in a way. Sounds like the yard was really busy working 24/7. I really enjoy all of the history surrounding the New Haven Railroad. That brick building with the 2 smoke stacks in the yard, did that used to be an old power plant? Also Where was the old yardmaster's located?
  by Noel Weaver
 
MNCRR9000 wrote:
Noel Weaver wrote:There was freight at Water Street in the NHRR and into the Penn Central period. The Winchester Job worked the lower end of the Canal Line within yard limits as did the West Haven Job which worked the industries off tracks 3 and 4 in West Haven and both of these jobs worked out of Water Street. There was an old wooden building with a yardmaster on the second floor and a switch tender among others as well as a clerk or two. There was also a mail terminal over behind Water Street toward Brewery Street and this had an engine working it 24 hours a day, a Water Street Job called the Mail Engine. There were also other places that got cars of meat, perishables and other freight downtown all handled out of Water Street.
One has to wonder today just what happened to all that business today, most of the places just plain shut down and/or moved away.
Noel Weaver
Sounds like the New Haven Rail Yard really had an interesting history. It definietly does kind of make you wonder where all of those businesses went and its kind of sad in a way. Sounds like the yard was really busy working 24/7. I really enjoy all of the history surrounding the New Haven Railroad. That brick building with the 2 smoke stacks in the yard, did that used to be an old power plant? Also Where was the old yardmaster's located?
The brick building with the two smoke stacks was the central heating plant. It produced a huge amount of steam to heat all of the coaches laying over, the locomotive shop, passenger station, motor storage, the GOB at 54 Meadow Street and everything else railroad in this area. It was demolished not too many years ago after a period of no use.
The Water Street Yard Office was located at the east end of the yard somewhat near where the big overhead bridge goes over the station tracks. It was an old and sort of run down wooden building which I seem to think was painted green.
Noel Weaver
  by MNCRR9000
 
Thats interesting that, that building used to be the central heating plants. Supplying steam to all the trains and buildings I could only imagine the amount of fuel they must have gone through to keep that place going.

Where is the current Yardmaster office located?

I was also looking on railpictures.net and they have some good pictures from back during the 60's and 70's. You were right about the yard not being recognizable these days, it looked so much different back then. Its great that the yard is going to get revitalized and will still plan a critical role in the years to come.
  by DutchRailnut
 
New haven has no yardmaster, the title is station master, the trailer is next to west end of wheelmill track.
  by Noel Weaver
 
DutchRailnut wrote:New haven has no yardmaster, the title is station master, the trailer is next to west end of wheelmill track.
I did not answer this one because I wasn't sure that it was still this way in New Haven. This goes back to the New Haven Railroad days when they basically had a glorified clerk doing yardmaster's work at much less pay and I guess nobody has had the pull to change this situation at least so far.
Years ago there were yardmasters at Water Street and at the West End Passenger Yard and I don't think the stationmaster handled very much yardmaster's work but over the years the other jobs were abolished while the stationmaster sort of took over the work. At one time this job was a bid job from the clerk's ranks, don't know if it still is.
Noel Weaver
  by MNCRR9000
 
DutchRailnut wrote:New haven has no yardmaster, the title is station master, the trailer is next to west end of wheelmill track.
I am kind of surprised that the station is in a trailer next to the west end of the wheelmill track. I thought they would have a office in the station on one of the upper floors.
  by Ridgefielder
 
MNCRR9000 wrote:
DutchRailnut wrote:New haven has no yardmaster, the title is station master, the trailer is next to west end of wheelmill track.
I am kind of surprised that the station is in a trailer next to the west end of the wheelmill track. I thought they would have a office in the station on one of the upper floors.
The station is no longer owned by the railroad-- believe it's owned by the New Haven Parking Authority or some such thing. That would probably be why.
  by MNCRR9000
 
Ridgefielder wrote:
MNCRR9000 wrote:
DutchRailnut wrote:New haven has no yardmaster, the title is station master, the trailer is next to west end of wheelmill track.
I am kind of surprised that the station is in a trailer next to the west end of the wheelmill track. I thought they would have a office in the station on one of the upper floors.
The station is no longer owned by the railroad-- believe it's owned by the New Haven Parking Authority or some such thing. That would probably be why.
I did some research and it appears that Union Station in New Haven is actually owned by the Connecticut Department Of Transportation but operated by the New Haven Parking Authority.
  by DutchRailnut
 
The New Yard office is in new building near lamberton street at end of new passenger yard.
the trailer has finally been retired ;-)
  by MNCRR9000
 
Thats nice that they are in the new building by Lamberton Street. How long have they been in that building?
  by DutchRailnut
 
a few years , since when new passenger yard opened.