• New Haven cranes and M.O.W

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by chnhrr
 
This is related to the topic below concerning the lone tender, but I’ve decided to create a separate topic for discussion. I have the Athearn HO scale model of the New Haven 230 ton crane unit which I mistakenly thought this was diesel or gas unit. I’m assuming the real cranes were manufactured by Brownhoist. Here is a scan of a photograph that I purchased at show a few years ago showing a 150 ton unit at Oak Point in 1948. Unfortunately the quality is not great
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How were the various cranes distributed throughout the rail system? Where they assigned to specific teams or tool/work train? Was crane operation preformed by a separate group or division other than M.O.W. Was the electricity for the overhead catenary wires turned off during crane operation on the mainline?
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  by Statkowski
 
Can't speak much on the other cranes, but the 230-ton cranes were situated in Oak Point, New Haven and, pretty sure, Providence. They were restricted from operating on numerous lines due to their size and weight. Those lighter rail/tighter clearance lines were covered by other cranes of smaller size and capacity.

If operating under the wire, then the wire would be deenergized to avoid any nasty incidents (the 11,000-volt current could jump up to two feet under certain circumstances).

The 230-ton cranes were part of a tool train. Others may have been. All of these trains were Maintenance of Way crews. When they had nothing else to do, they repainted their equipment, hence the "McGinnis" tender.
  by chnhrr
 
Thanks for your insight.
Does anyone know when the NYW&B went under in 1937, if the New Haven ever took possession of the line car pictured for its own use on the mainline? It seamed like a nifty device, but it may have not been applicable to the NH.
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  by Rick Abramson
 
The 230 ton locomotive big hooks were numbered and based as follows: D-100; New Haven, D-101; Providence, D-102; Oak Point. They were all steam powered.
  by Otto Vondrak
 
chnhrr wrote:Thanks for your insight.
Does anyone know when the NYW&B went under in 1937, if the New Haven ever took possession of the line car pictured for its own use on the mainline? It seamed like a nifty device, but it may have not been applicable to the NH.
The NYW&B's gasoline-powered crane car was used to dismantle the line in 1942 by the scrapper, then scrapped itself.

http://nywbry.com/history.php

-otto-
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Two photos of New Haven cranes responding to a 1937 wreck at Port Chester, New York on the New York, Westchester & Boston. Crane D-8 is only lettered "New Haven," and the second crane is lettered "HARLEM RIVER" on the crane arm.
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  by chnhrr
 
Thanks Otto for that background and the photos. Oddly enough this has come up on eBay for sale, a 1958 (possibly a repro) map showing the limitations or extents for the 230 ton cranes on the NH system.
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  by chnhrr
 
Here’s one of the New Haven’s cranes with rubber wheels, needing a new paint job.
I’m not sure how many the NH had of these.
(photo courtesy e-Bay)
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  by rghammill
 
There was a 3-ton, kerosene driven Brownhoist crane with a 29' boom and a bucket and hook assigned to New Britain, CT, number H-35. I have not been able to find a picture of it yet.

Until around 1946-47 there were two T-2 switchers assigned to New Britain. In addition, there was a RIP track. I believe the crane was used for coal and for repairs when needed. It was assigned through at least early 1953, but had been scrapped by mid 1956.