• New England Transrail

  • Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.
Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.

Moderator: MEC407

  by newpylong
 
I am going to put this here because I figured they will have to interchange with PAR and you people probably know more than any other forum on this area...

http://www.stb.dot.gov/filings/all.nsf/ ... 239054.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

What in god's name in this?

Here is what I found using the google: https://www.federalregister.gov/article ... e-railroad" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Can someone shed some light as to where they are taking about?
  by atholrail
 
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.52592,- ... rw&newdg=1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by YamaOfParadise
 
It looks like at least one of these segments could be the spur remnant of the old Woburn Loop (the north end of it), which is near that superfund site. It's just north of the area linked in the map above.
  by atholrail
 
Here?

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5303329 ... a=!3m1!1e3" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by YamaOfParadise
 
Yeah, that satisfies the requirements of "(3) from a point near the western end of the track described in (2) above and extending one-tenth of a mile in a southerly direction (including a switch)" in the Federal Register notice (the point identified in (2) is MP 14.00). MP 14.00 on the NH Mainline (which I assume is what they're calling the "Boston-Concord mainline") is the timetable station "Woburn Junction" in employee timetables. That spur servicing the industrial park is at about MP 13.30, which is close to the listed MP 13.25, but that track also does not quite progress in a northerly direction as one of the segments is described. Asides from that, beats me, the fact that it isn't using accurate names is a disservice to trying to decipher it.
  by BostonUrbEx
 
Just search for New England Transrail.

http://homenewshere.com/wilmington_town ... 49bd1.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

"NET plans to purchase the property from Olin for the purpose of constructing a rail-to-truck transloading operation using 32 acres of the 50+ acre site. Items to be off loaded to boxcars, tractor-trailer trucks, and tanker cars potentially include plastic pellets and magnesium chloride."

"The plan is for 20 to 25 rail cars to come into the site daily, six days per week, with an expected arrival of between 5:30 am and 6:00 am to transfer material and move to the final destination estimated to be within 2 hours of Wilmington. Each car is expected to contain 3 ½ truckloads of material. Trucks would return and reload for a second delivery with operations expected to conclude by 4:00 pm each day."

Also, a search for the Wilmington & Woburn Terminal Railroad turns up this good size thread from 2006:

http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewtopi ... 126&t=2720" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Great news for the region, rail, and PAR -- if it happens. Seems to keep surfacing over and over again. May actually happen now, post-recession.
  by Hux
 
BostonUrbEx wrote:Just search for New England Transrail.

http://homenewshere.com/wilmington_town ... 49bd1.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

"NET plans to purchase the property from Olin for the purpose of constructing a rail-to-truck transloading operation using 32 acres of the 50+ acre site. Items to be off loaded to boxcars, tractor-trailer trucks, and tanker cars potentially include plastic pellets and magnesium chloride."

"The plan is for 20 to 25 rail cars to come into the site daily, six days per week, with an expected arrival of between 5:30 am and 6:00 am to transfer material and move to the final destination estimated to be within 2 hours of Wilmington. Each car is expected to contain 3 ½ truckloads of material. Trucks would return and reload for a second delivery with operations expected to conclude by 4:00 pm each day."

Also, a search for the Wilmington & Woburn Terminal Railroad turns up this good size thread from 2006:

http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewtopi ... 126&t=2720" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Great news for the region, rail, and PAR -- if it happens. Seems to keep surfacing over and over again. May actually happen now, post-recession.
About time. I go by there a few days a week. Place has been sitting vacant for quite some time. The cement place across the street sees regular rail deliveries (which have picked up a lot of late). Trucks can get out to 93 & 95 North or South relatively easy using Eames St to Woburn St. to Presidential Way. Mostly industrial and office park and one set of lights at the connector to I-93.
  by Sir Ray
 
Gentlemen, we are missing a key component here - from the STB filing:
multi-purpose transload facility - now commonly known among transportation planners as a rail freight village
I never heard that phrase before, but apparently it's been around for awhile. I always knew them as industrial parks (rail-served industrial parks), as their American example Raritan Center in NJ, and heard of industrial estates in the UK.
"Freight village" just sounds...silly.
  by F-line to Dudley via Park
 
Hux wrote:
BostonUrbEx wrote:Just search for New England Transrail.

http://homenewshere.com/wilmington_town ... 49bd1.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

"NET plans to purchase the property from Olin for the purpose of constructing a rail-to-truck transloading operation using 32 acres of the 50+ acre site. Items to be off loaded to boxcars, tractor-trailer trucks, and tanker cars potentially include plastic pellets and magnesium chloride."

"The plan is for 20 to 25 rail cars to come into the site daily, six days per week, with an expected arrival of between 5:30 am and 6:00 am to transfer material and move to the final destination estimated to be within 2 hours of Wilmington. Each car is expected to contain 3 ½ truckloads of material. Trucks would return and reload for a second delivery with operations expected to conclude by 4:00 pm each day."

Also, a search for the Wilmington & Woburn Terminal Railroad turns up this good size thread from 2006:

viewtopic.php?f=126&t=2720" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Great news for the region, rail, and PAR -- if it happens. Seems to keep surfacing over and over again. May actually happen now, post-recession.
About time. I go by there a few days a week. Place has been sitting vacant for quite some time. The cement place across the street sees regular rail deliveries (which have picked up a lot of late). Trucks can get out to 93 & 95 North or South relatively easy using Eames St to Woburn St. to Presidential Way. Mostly industrial and office park and one set of lights at the connector to I-93.
This probably would still be a pretty thick net of sidings in this area if PAR hadn't scared away all the biz. Best highway access bar none to all points around Greater Boston with proximity to the 93/128 interchange and separate entrances onto each highway. It's why the whole area around Anderson RTC station has remained industrial despite many superficial attempts to market the station area into some sort of mixed-use narnia in the making. Those companies don't want to move. I bet PAR's eventual successor draws a big bullseye on the Winchester-Wilmington stretch of the NH Main as a growth opportunity, NIMBY's be damned. Eames St./Woburn Loop and the Wilmington Cold Storage spur are both extremely well-situated, and someday MassDOT will finally get the severed ends of New Boston St. reconnected over the tracks with the new overpass that's been in design for several eons. Could also see the power line ROW bordering the south end of Anderson RTC as a rail-related development site somebody more motivated than PAR could push. The strip of land under the power lines between the main and Presidential Way is bulldozed industrial property that per Historic Aerials used to many years ago have a siding running along the United Refrigeration building, forking off the mainline on that NW tip where the brook is covered over. No wetlands on most of that 2500' x 275' slab of land, just the asphalt and gravel remains of what was wiped clean many years ago.
  by l008com
 
This was a popular topic back when I first started using this site regularly. In the summer, I bike all over that area at night. It will be cool as a railfan to see activity pick up. The town is very against the re-use of this land, but their arguments never quite made sense. And yes, if you poke around with google maps, you can see TONS of old sidings to nearly every warehouse near or remotely near the tracks. I often scratch my head when I'm riding through this area, to see ARMYs of tractor trailers, and a completely disconnected railroad a stones through away. Probably one of the biggest place in the area is the huge marshalls distribution center. They are not sitting directly on the rail line, but they are very close and theres tons of space in that area to build a spur to their building if they wanted it. I'm no logistics expert so who knows if it would even make sense for them to use rail specifically. But general, theres a huge number of companies that could make great use of this. Who knows if any of that expansion will happen, but it does look like NET is happening. And even if that's the extent of the growth, it's good to see at least that opportunity isn't going to waste.
  by BM6569
 
What is the status of this project?
  by newpylong
 
l008com wrote:This was a popular topic back when I first started using this site regularly. In the summer, I bike all over that area at night. It will be cool as a railfan to see activity pick up. The town is very against the re-use of this land, but their arguments never quite made sense. And yes, if you poke around with google maps, you can see TONS of old sidings to nearly every warehouse near or remotely near the tracks. I often scratch my head when I'm riding through this area, to see ARMYs of tractor trailers, and a completely disconnected railroad a stones through away. Probably one of the biggest place in the area is the huge marshalls distribution center. They are not sitting directly on the rail line, but they are very close and theres tons of space in that area to build a spur to their building if they wanted it. I'm no logistics expert so who knows if it would even make sense for them to use rail specifically. But general, theres a huge number of companies that could make great use of this. Who knows if any of that expansion will happen, but it does look like NET is happening. And even if that's the extent of the growth, it's good to see at least that opportunity isn't going to waste.
What use would Marshals or any store like that have for non-TOFC service?
  by l008com
 
newpylong wrote:What use would Marshals or any store like that have for non-TOFC service?
It's not a store, it's a massive distribution center. Surely the stuff that goes out TO stores would need to go out by truck. But the stuff that comes IN to the center, that could potentially come in by rail, depending on what it is or where its coming from.
  by newpylong
 
I know - I used to live less than 10 miles from there.

They would never use rail to their door. The products come from too many sources and there is not enough volume. They would dray from an IM terminal.

The closest thing to a big box store using rail to door is Home Depot and their regional lumber warehouses.