Discussion of the past and present operations of the Long Island Rail Road.

Moderator: Liquidcamphor

  by Kelly&Kelly
 
The LIRR is regularly served with "STOP WORK ORDERS" that get posted on its buildings from time to time when construction woek is done without the permission or permits of local municipalities. Many of the villages and towns have building department employees that believe the railroad must submit plans and seek approvals for work conducted in their villages.

The State of New York requires municipal subdivisions or jurisdictions to issue a "building permit" before certain construction or demolition is performed.

Of course the railroad property is governed by the NYS Railway Law and is exempt from such oversight by local villages. The LIRR issues itself its own "Building Permits" to comply with these laws. Railroads are also exempt from much other heavy industrial oversight such as OSHA regulation, though the LIRR considers these laws as guidelines and makes attempts to comply where practicable.
  by scopelliti
 
Thought I read the word "abatement" somewhere. Perhaps asbestos?
  by west point
 
what about the building next door collapsing on the tower trapping some LIRR personnel ?.
  by Kelly&Kelly
 
When the contractor was demolishing the substation using mechanical means, some bricks were thrown in front of Nassau Tower's door, obstruction occupants' egress. Mechanical demolition would normally be prohibited in that area, except for the railroad's exemption from the local laws.

This morning, a female ironworker setting the pedestrian overpass at Mineola was critically electrocuted when the crane moving it contacted overhead wires. The work was being done by an MTA contractor.
  by MACTRAXX
 
Everyone: BM posted two pictures taken at Nassau Tower and the sub-station (site) before and after the building
demolition - one from the Summer of 2020 and on Saturday March 13 in the Third Track Project topic.

When I was at the site last Thursday I noticed that the remaining bricks that were around all had "SAGE" on them.
I searched and found that the long-defunct Sage Brick Manufacturing Company was located in the Greenport area
and was in business between 1887 and 1938. There were once clay beds on the shoreline of Peconic Bay between
Southold and Greenport at Arshamomaque which was the prime source for brick making.

An Arcadia book about Greenport mentions the Sage Brickyard, President of the Sage Brick Company De Witt
Clinton Sage and that a combination of the Great Depression of the 1930s and the 1938 Hurricane destroying
the clay bed sources put Sage Brick out of business.

There is an interesting website about brickmaking history and collecting:
https://brickcollecting.com/collection2.htm
Scroll down to "Sage Brick Manufacturing Company"

The SAGE bricks used to construct the Mineola substation were shipped most likely by trainload back in 1910.
Was the LIRR a regular customer of Sage Brick? One mention was that 30 million Sage Bricks were used in the
construction of the Central Islip State Hospital (1899) - probably shipped by LIRR freight trains back then.

I was able to get one SAGE brick with permission for RMLI - an appropriate item having LIRR and North Fork origin.
MACTRAXX
  by newkirk
 
Why does Nassau tower seem to have achieved iconic status ?

Is it because it has appeared in many photos over the years ?

Or is it the last of a dying breed of old wood structure towers ?
  by krispy
 
I'm guessing ease of access, and the type of equipment going past. Pond is virtually the same structure in every respect but due to it's lack of access, you rarely have the same of press that Nassau got. Nassau regularly had railfans hanging around until at least 1 am, all of the other tower jobs would rarely get one once in a blue moon. There was a good mix of equipment going by too, MU's diesels and freights.

It was a nice job to work, but just too close to the ROW. That building would rock back and forth every time you had a flyer go by, so one way or another, it was coming down.
  by newkirk
 
krispy wrote: It was a nice job to work, but just too close to the ROW. That building would rock back and forth every time you had a flyer go by, so one way or another, it was coming down.
I wonder if PD tower in Patchogue did the same. I called it the leaning tower of Patchogue. lol
  by krispy
 
PD was different in that the flyers were fewer and slower going through the interlocking. But yes, it was leaning over pretty good by the time the end came. Removing it's strong-arm machine and adding a toilet on the second floor gave it the lean.
  by RGlueck
 
" adding a toilet on the second floor gave it the lean." I guess that spilled the beans.
  by newkirk
 
I stopped by this morning and lo and behold, Nassau Tower is still standing.

On the site of the former substation is a temporary construction trailer that wasn't there last week.

Is the end near ?
  by BuddR32
 
newkirk wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 1:26 pm I stopped by this morning and lo and behold, Nassau Tower is still standing.

On the site of the former substation is a temporary construction trailer that wasn't there last week.

Is the end near ?
I don't know, but the lights are still on, so power hasn't been disconnected yet. I do believe water service has been turned off since the substation came down.