• Mixed New Haven/Penn Central Consists on NEC circa 1969 ?

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by Rick Abramson
 
Tommy:

Here's the 4936 at SS-14 on 8/13/64.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
  by Noel Weaver
 
Eliphaz wrote:couple more pics of PC+NH lashups on NERail
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?photo ... %20Central
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?photo ... %20Central
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?photo ... %20Central
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?photo ... %20Central
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?photo ... %20Central
Interesting stuff but the Alco RS-11's are most likely all former NHRR engines anyway. I think the question was former PRR or former NYC engines MU'd with former NHRR engines. It was pretty common during the Penn Centreal era especially with freight power and even with passenger power too. I made more than one trip between New Haven and Boston with an E-8 and an FL-9, either one could be on the head end although we would get a better ride from the E-8 but if we wanted cab heat with the E-8 on the head end we would have to run a steam generator because the cab heat on the former PRR engines at this time were from the steam lines rather than hot water and later electric.
Noel Weaver
  by Tommy Meehan
 
Rick Abramson wrote:Here's the 4936 at SS-14 on 8/13/64.
What a great shot of what must've seemed a very unusual event. Rick I guess you knew well in advance it was coming. Do you recall what train that was? What is typical of the way I remember the New Haven's Washington-Boston trains was the head end cars.

Thanks for posting.
  by davidp
 
Mixed FL9 lashups were common on the Danbury Branch in the early seventies. There were three paint schemes in existance - the original McgInnis NH scheme, black Penn Central, and Blue/Yellow MTA-PC. The two daily through trains were assigned back-to-back FL9s, and they could be of any scheme. Coaches were mostly PS "shoreliners" in a mix of NH orange and PC green.
  by Noel Weaver
 
davidp wrote:Mixed FL9 lashups were common on the Danbury Branch in the early seventies. There were three paint schemes in existance - the original McgInnis NH scheme, black Penn Central, and Blue/Yellow MTA-PC. The two daily through trains were assigned back-to-back FL9s, and they could be of any scheme. Coaches were mostly PS "shoreliners" in a mix of NH orange and PC green.
They might have been mixed paint jobs but they were ALL former New Haven engines. I think the original question pertained to mixing former New Haven Railroad Locomotives with former New York Central or former Pennsylvania locomotives and I know it took place both with the FL-9's but also with various freight locomotives. I had some interesting
combinations in my extra list days not too long after the takeover on 1-1-69.
Noel Weaver
  by chnhrr
 
I remember in the late sixties seeing two GG-1s pulling freight through Old Greenwich heading towards Stamford. As a kid, I was astonished at the sight of these Tuscan red animals. They looked liked they came from another planet. I also remember the sound of them being quite impressive. It would be years later in the Amtrak period that I would see them briefly in there original home territory. Rick, thanks for the posting of that pic.
  by Noel Weaver
 
chnhrr wrote:I remember in the late sixties seeing two GG-1s pulling freight through Old Greenwich heading towards Stamford. As a kid, I was astonished at the sight of these Tuscan red animals. They looked liked they came from another planet. I also remember the sound of them being quite impressive. It would be years later in the Amtrak period that I would see them briefly in there original home territory. Rick, thanks for the posting of that pic.
There were no electric freight trains west of New Haven after the first week or two of Penn Central operation. You may have seen an M of W work extra, a circus train or a mail train that consisted of all flexi vans with a caboose. All three have occurred on this line after January 1, 1969.
An electric powere M of W extra would be an Amtrak move. A circus train, whatever but probably R B B & B, mail train 16 and 17 ran for a period in the early 70's as stated above.
Noel Weaver
  by Rick Abramson
 
Glad you liked the GG1 at SS-14. Here's 4862 at Oak Point on 2/21/61.

Rick
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
  by Tommy Meehan
 
Wowee thanks Rick.

Someone on Yahoo had mentioned they thought -- in addition to 4936 running to New Haven and back in 1964 -- there was a test made with a GG1 in 1961. Is that why 4862 was at Oak Point?
  by Noel Weaver
 
This was another test move, this time a light engine. I didn't think the date was 1961 and would question the date but I do remember when this move took place. I think it was closer to 1963 or early 1964.
Noel Weaver
  by Rick Abramson
 
Tommy:

Glad you like the shot. Apparently, the NH and PRR began test runs of the GG1s as early as 1961 based on the date written on the back of the photo. Who would have thought that by 1969 the GG1s would be standard power on the Penn jobs to New Haven.
Rick
  by Tommy Meehan
 
I do enjoy these historic and unusual photos Rick, thanks very much.

The photo is a bit dark but it very clearly shows the two shoes or current collectors on 4862's front pantograph. They apparently proved troublesome on the New Haven after PC took over and the GG1 became standard power.
  by Noel Weaver
 
The double shoe pantographs were so troublesome on the New Haven side that all of the pantographs on the GG-1's that were assigned to passenger service and maybe all of the as well were changed to single shoe pantographs. It was sort of like they just got changed and I think it happened for the most part in 1969.
I am still not convinced that this light engine test run took place in 1961. Up until July of 1961 the New Haven was still under the clutches of the anti electric George Alpert bunch and after it finally went bankrupt for the final time the trustees had too much other stuff to worry about to be doing things like testing PRR locomotives. I was working in the towers on the New York end of the railroad (Bridgeport mostly) for a good part of 1964 and I think this test run occurred while I was working in this capacity. It wasn't too long after the test run that a PRR GG-1 made a revenue run on a passenger train from New York to New Haven and back apparently without any major problems.
Noel Weaver