• Indonesia locomotive lamp signal

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
Certainly, in America, locomotive lamp signal consist by a headlamp and beamerlamp. In Indonesia is're differenly stories, Indonesia locomotive lamp signal consist by a : (1)Headlamp(1/2/3/4 points of lamp, (2)foglamp, certainly 2 points of lamp yettttt, (3)Marks of end coach lamp, left-right side and centre, certainly red color yettt, (4)Marks of shunting activity lamp, orange color, left-right side(5)Marks of cross moving palace, now not use again, because was repalaced by a HT and train dispatcher news, green color, left-right side and centre.

Locomotive lamp signal inthe points of 3,4,5 assemblies above cowhanger

Any openvoice or question
  by johnthefireman
 
In much of Europe, including the UK, I think the standard is three bright headlamps forming a triangle on the front of the train.

In older times British locomotives did not have headlamps as such. Instead they had marker lamps on the front of the loco indicating what type of train it was. There were four possible lamp positions, one at each side mounted on the buffer beam, one central on the buffer beam, and one on the centre line of the smokebox high up. Offhand I can remember that a fast express or mail train (plus breakdown train or snowplough en route to a job) was two lamps, one at each side of the buffer beam. A royal train would have lamps in all four positions. Google "british railway headlamp codes" and you'll find plenty of diagrams.

In South Africa locos carry a large headlamp, usually a double lamp so that if one bulb fails the other can be switched on. The headlamp has both bright and dim settings, the latter to avoid dazzling the driver of an oncoming train. A shunting locomotive will also display a red lamp at the rear of the loco.

In much of British-influenced Africa (including Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Sudan and Kenya) locos have a single bright headlamp (or at least they used to - I don't know if that has changed with the influx of Chinese railway practice).
  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
johnthefireman wrote:In much of Europe, including the UK, I think the standard is three bright headlamps forming a triangle on the front of the train.

In older times British locomotives did not have headlamps as such. Instead they had marker lamps on the front of the loco indicating what type of train it was. There were four possible lamp positions, one at each side mounted on the buffer beam, one central on the buffer beam, and one on the centre line of the smokebox high up. Offhand I can remember that a fast express or mail train (plus breakdown train or snowplough en route to a job) was two lamps, one at each side of the buffer beam. A royal train would have lamps in all four positions. Google "british railway headlamp codes" and you'll find plenty of diagrams.

In South Africa locos carry a large headlamp, usually a double lamp so that if one bulb fails the other can be switched on. The headlamp has both bright and dim settings, the latter to avoid dazzling the driver of an oncoming train. A shunting locomotive will also display a red lamp at the rear of the loco.

In much of British-influenced Africa (including Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Sudan and Kenya) locos have a single bright headlamp (or at least they used to - I don't know if that has changed with the influx of Chinese railway practice).
I think i mention it, doesn't applicable for EMU inthe Jabodetabek megapolitan area, only consist by a 1 couple of headlamp and 1 couple of coach end marks lamp, likewise too onthe DMU with primemover, but, the headlamp, foglamp coach end marks was used,, the another not used. I don't know why the marks of shunting activity not use
  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
ASK

Why locomotive lamp signal in New Zealand and Malaysia?
  by george matthews
 
johnthefireman wrote:In much of Europe, including the UK, I think the standard is three bright headlamps forming a triangle on the front of the train.

In older times British locomotives did not have headlamps as such. Instead they had marker lamps on the front of the loco indicating what type of train it was. There were four possible lamp positions, one at each side mounted on the buffer beam, one central on the buffer beam, and one on the centre line of the smokebox high up. Offhand I can remember that a fast express or mail train (plus breakdown train or snowplough en route to a job) was two lamps, one at each side of the buffer beam. A royal train would have lamps in all four positions. Google "british railway headlamp codes" and you'll find plenty of diagrams.

In South Africa locos carry a large headlamp, usually a double lamp so that if one bulb fails the other can be switched on. The headlamp has both bright and dim settings, the latter to avoid dazzling the driver of an oncoming train. A shunting locomotive will also display a red lamp at the rear of the loco.

In much of British-influenced Africa (including Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Sudan and Kenya) locos have a single bright headlamp (or at least they used to - I don't know if that has changed with the influx of Chinese railway practice).
In Africa it is important to have a bright light ahead of the train to look out for animals. The tracks are seldom fenced and herds of animals are common.
  by johnthefireman
 
george matthews wrote:In Africa it is important to have a bright light ahead of the train to look out for animals. The tracks are seldom fenced and herds of animals are common.
Yes, that would generally have been the case. Most African train services operated relatively slowly so there might have been the opportunity to slow down or possibly stop before hitting an animal, or at least to give a good blast on the whistle or horn to try to scare it away. If I recall correctly the South African rule book states that if you hit an animal you are not allowed to stop and collect the meat, although I suspect that was a rule rarely followed. You're just supposed to report it at the next station.

Mind you, South Africa used to have some trains scheduled to run at up to 110 km/h, and for a few years the Metroblitz ran at 160 km/hr, so there would have been little chance of them stopping for an animal.

Some of the more recently-built fast train services (eg the 160 km/hr Gautrain in South Africa, the 120 km/hr standard gauge in Kenya) are largely fenced. Not sure what the situation is with the genuinely high speed train in Morocco.

These days, unfortunately, there are far fewer animals to be hit due to climate change, loss of habitat, expansion of human populations and infrastructure (including railways), poaching, etc which have devastated many animal populations in Africa.
  by David Benton
 
Ronal U18C Indonesia wrote:ASK

Why locomotive lamp signal in New Zealand and Malaysia?
In New Zealand, there was just the single or double headlight. With the small number of trains, there was no need for identification. Modern locomotives also have the ditch lights (low level), which flash when the horn is sounded , or when approaching stations, level crossings. the rear of the train had a red light in 3 corners, this has been replaced with a single flashing red on the rear end device.
  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
And what locomotive lamp signal in Malaysia?
  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
johnthefireman wrote:In much of Europe, including the UK, I think the standard is three bright headlamps forming a triangle on the front of the train.

In older times British locomotives did not have headlamps as such. Instead they had marker lamps on the front of the loco indicating what type of train it was. There were four possible lamp positions, one at each side mounted on the buffer beam, one central on the buffer beam, and one on the centre line of the smokebox high up. Offhand I can remember that a fast express or mail train (plus breakdown train or snowplough en route to a job) was two lamps, one at each side of the buffer beam. A royal train would have lamps in all four positions. Google "british railway headlamp codes" and you'll find plenty of diagrams.

In South Africa locos carry a large headlamp, usually a double lamp so that if one bulb fails the other can be switched on. The headlamp has both bright and dim settings, the latter to avoid dazzling the driver of an oncoming train. A shunting locomotive will also display a red lamp at the rear of the loco.

In much of British-influenced Africa (including Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Sudan and Kenya) locos have a single bright headlamp (or at least they used to - I don't know if that has changed with the influx of Chinese railway practice).
Mr Johnthefireman're retired train driver? Expert in signaling problem?
  by johnthefireman
 
Not a retired driver, nor an expert in signalling. I am not a professional but I spend time as a volunteer operating historic steam locomotives in both South Africa and Kenya. To qualify to operate steam trains on the main line in South Africa we had to do the same training course at the national railway college as professional staff, and pass the same exams, except for the modules on the locomotive itself, where we learned steam and they learned diesel and/or electric. I qualified to fire steam locomotives on the main line and to drive them in depots and yards. As part of our training we had to learn the systems of train control (signalling), and then we experienced it regularly as we actually operated trains. It's something a driver pays a lot of attention to - proceeding when you haven't got the proper authority to do so is obviously very dangerous indeed.
  by Ronal U18C Indonesia
 
What's the function of beamerlamp of American locomotive, EMU and DMU train?