• GE to build Tier 4 diesel engines for Houston, TX

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by MEC407
 
GE will be building marine and locomotive diesel engines for the Houston, TX Port Authority that are capable of meeting the EPA's Tier 4 emissions standards, to be used in the authority's locomotives and tug boats. The engines will start shipping in 2013.
Houston Chronicle wrote:Port Authority chief Jim Edmonds says the new engines will leapfrog the EPA emission standard to a Tier 4 nitrogen oxides-compliant diesel engine years before it's mandated.
For more info: http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/bus ... 54912.html
  by Allen Hazen
 
Intriguing. Engines to be installed in Port Terminal locomotives-- sounds like a plan to re-engine existing locomotives. Port Terminal, I would think, is (in its railroad operations) a switching, maybe transfer and some local freight, business: so, not a likely customer for 4400 hp locomotives. Is this maybe the beginning of the long awaited GEVO - 6 locomotive project?
(Well, beginning in the U.S. Wasn't there an announcement a few months back about GE building switching locomotives in Kazakhstan?)
  by MEC407
 
They also have an straight-8 GEVO, which I assume would fit nicely in the space formerly occupied by a 16-645. :wink: The straight-6 is probably more likely, though, since its 2000 HP rating hits the sweet spot for switchers these days.

Edit: according to this, their roster consists entirely of MP1500Ds. I know those are Cat-powered, but I can't remember if the engines are 12 or 16 cylinder. Even if they're 16, I imagine they're shorter than a 16-645. I guess a straight-8 GEVO might be a tight fit, then. :wink: But the straight-6 could work.
  by D.Carleton
 
The MP1500D is powered by the Caterpillar 3512 which is spec’d out at 67.7” high and 105.35” long. The in-line six GEVO with shallow sump is 116” high and 200” long. With the GEVO at close to four feet higher than the Cat I think it safe to say that is not what they are offering, at least in the locomotive repowerings. Perhaps a domestic application of the former Jenbacher series?
  by RickRackstop
 
Did I read this right. GE is investing 50 million of its own dollars in this project. Since when did GE become a charity. I know some marine operators wouldn't use GE engines if they gave them away. Well we'll see.
  by MEC407
 
D.Carleton wrote:The MP1500D is powered by the Caterpillar 3512 which is spec’d out at 67.7” high and 105.35” long. The in-line six GEVO with shallow sump is 116” high and 200” long. With the GEVO at close to four feet higher than the Cat I think it safe to say that is not what they are offering, at least in the locomotive repowerings. Perhaps a domestic application of the former Jenbacher series?
Thanks for the measurements, and you're right, the I-6 GEVO would seem like an unlikely candidate when put in that context... unless they're talking about lengthening the frames of the locomotives -- something that has been done in the past with certain major rebuilds, but I have no idea how difficult or how expensive it is.

Right after I posted that second article this morning, I wondered if this could be a chance for them to start marketing their Jenbacher-derived engines in the U.S. They transformed what was originally the Jenbacher J616 into the PowerHaul P616 for their new locomotives in the U.K. Perhaps the Jenbacher J612 could similarly be developed into a PowerHaul P612. Do you happen to know the dimensions for the J612?
  by DutchRailnut
 
don't forget a straight whatever is higher than a V whatever.
so a GEVO straight 6 or 8 probably won't fit a MP1500
  by D.Carleton
 
MEC407 wrote:Do you happen to know the dimensions for the J612?
Off hand, no, none are in use domestically... yet. The P616 spec's out at 151" in length and 95.4" high. Using some back-of-the-envelope calcs a theoretical P612 could be around 113" long.
  by MEC407
 
Interesting. So, they'd definitely have to make the hood taller, but other than that, they might be able to squeeze in a P612 without lengthening the frame. Of course this assumes that the new cooling system isn't any bigger than the old one; that's a very big assumption and probably isn't the case.

The plot thickens!
  by RickRackstop
 
At 2 million a piece GE could design and build all new 4 axle DC units with a gas fuel Jenbacher engine at 1500 hp. That way they have design compatibility assured.
  by D.Carleton
 
Of course all of this is armchair speculation. The P616 engines used in the PowerHaul PH37ACmi locomotives are built here. They have invested a lot of capital to come up with a ‘green’ primemover to keep the tree huggers at bay. It would be in their interests to maximize the investment by widening the market here at home. It would be interesting to see if GE offers the P616 as a ‘green’ repowering option for older DASH 8 locomotives, vis-à-vis the EMD 710 ECO line. Again, this is all speculation from the sidelines. For all we know they could be installing a giant hamster wheel…
  by RickRackstop
 
D.Carleton wrote:Of course all of this is armchair speculation. The P616 engines used in the PowerHaul PH37ACmi locomotives are built here. They have invested a lot of capital to come up with a ‘green’ primemover to keep the tree huggers at bay. It would be in their interests to maximize the investment by widening the market here at home. It would be interesting to see if GE offers the P616 as a ‘green’ repowering option for older DASH 8 locomotives, vis-à-vis the EMD 710 ECO line. Again, this is all speculation from the sidelines. For all we know they could be installing a giant hamster wheel…
Or molten salt battery locomotives, moves the source of pollution out of the county. Remember GE is building the battery plant in New York State at New York taxpayers expense.
  by D.Carleton
 
Has there been any more info on what GE is selling the Port of Houston as a repower package?