• England Preserved Railway Access

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by Rich T
 
I will be travelling from The States throughout England for about two and a half weeks using a continuous railpass durng June 04.
Suggestions on which of the more interesting preserved railways are accessible by the network rail services will be appreciated.
One specific request is travelling to Folkstone the most efficent way to visit the Romney, Hyde and Dymchurch?
Thank you in advance.

  by David Benton
 
i have a british atlas , on which Sandling , on the folkestone line , appears to be the closest station .
Most of the preserved lines i travelled on were in Wales . From aberystwyth, the vale of rehoild r.r , abd the Ffestinnog r.r form near Harlech , or the other end connects to the northwales line to Holyhead . that would make a nice circle trip .
i went to the Bluebell r.r , but im pretty sure you have to take a bus to get to it .

  by Rich T
 
Thank you for your suggestions David. Last year I spent a considerable amount of time in Wales that included the Festiniog and hiring a canal boat. The others you mention I've done on prior trips, this year my plan is to do the Midlands and the South of England.
Anyone interested in heritage railways should consider the Isle of Mann which was also absolutely wonderful last year.

  by Guest
 
>>One specific request is travelling to Folkstone the most efficent way to visit the Romney, Hyde and Dymchurch?<<

Yes, but you can also get out at Sandling. However, you are more likely to get a bus to Hythe from Folkestone. Get out at Folkestone Central. From Sandling it's about a mile walk (much of it downhill).

  by george matthews
 
>>One specific request is travelling to Folkstone the most efficent way to visit the Romney, Hyde and Dymchurch?<<

Yes, but you can also get out at Sandling. However, you are more likely to get a bus to Hythe from Folkestone. Get out at Folkestone Central. The bus to Hythe probably goes from the bus station. You may need to ask people.

From Sandling it's about a mile walk (much of it downhill). There may or may not be a bus there.

  by Rich T
 
Thank you George. Would Sandling be a place where a bed & breakfast could be found?

  by george matthews
 
There are B&Bs all round there but Hythe would be a more likely place to look.

There are web sites of B&Bs. Try google with B&B Kent Hythe and see what turns up.

  by NJTfan
 
It's probobly too late but I'm suprised no one has mentioned the Tallylln Railway! They have 7 different steam locos and a few diesels too, quite interesting.

And for what it's worth- they call them Railways in the UK & Canda, and sometimes railroads in the US are called railways too. The Great Northern (US) and the Southern (US) come to mind.

  by David Benton
 
I think rich t stated a few posts above that he had already covered the welsh narrow gauge lines .

We call them railways here in NEw Zealand and Australia too . I think the USA is the only country that refers to them as railroads . In the English speaking world that is . I guess something like the spanish / Italian ferrovia ( steel road ?) translates to railroad , unless Via can also mean way .

  by NJTfan
 
Yes the other Welsh narrow gauge railways were covered but I didn't see the Tallylln.

Oh and sorry to have forgotten Australia and New Zealand.

  by David Benton
 
Thats true , he doesn't mention it .
I missed it too , on my tour of Wales , I think i went past its station on the mainline train , but didint stop . sounds like i missed a good experience .
  by Rich T
 
In regard to my original inquiries there is very convenient accomodation directly outside Folkestone Central station.
The Park Inn Hotel is a Victorian era structure in a attractive location providing clean rooms, breakfast, and a pub, plus inexpensive. It is situated about a 5 minute walk from the bus terminal where a double decker will take you to the Romney Hythe and Dymchurch. A longer walk through the narrow lanes will bring you to the harbor and the Orient Express station located on the pier. A short distance north is a large imposing stone viaduct.
Deserving some time also a water powered "lift", or funicular, from the top of the hill overlooking the harbor.