• Eastern European Steam Loco Photos

  • Discussion of steam locomotives from all manufacturers and railroads
Discussion of steam locomotives from all manufacturers and railroads

Moderators: slide rules, Typewriters

  by LZ18
 
Hi there. so i've thought about posting some foreign steam locomotive pictures here. All of these are from eastern europe. A great majority are of german, hungarian or romanian construction. All of them are located in romania, which has quite a large steam loco heritage (mainly because steam engines were in regular use along diesel and electric engines up until the 1970s and 80s, and as such a great many survived, although very few are operational nowadays). i could post more photos if anyone is interested

Class 151.002 - 151 stands for one leading wheel, five driving wheels and one trailing, and the '002' counts the fabrication number. loosely based on a German design and built around the late 1930s. Only two units were built, and the other one got destroyed during the second world war. Could top at around 55 mph

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  by Allen Hazen
 
Thank you for posting that!
151 for a locomotive configured with a single axle leading (or "pilot") truck, five driving axles, and a single axle trailing truck is the convention used in (among other places) France and Russia. The usual American convention -- the "Whyte system" -- counts wheels instead of axles, so this locomotive in American parlance is a 2-10-2.
It LOOKS very Germanic in details. Do you know if it is derived from one of the German 150 (2-10-0) designs, perhaps just adding a truck at the rear to spread the weight a bit more, perhaps to support a larger firebox?
  by LZ18
 
Thanks for clearing that up. i should have said 'axles'. anyway, yes, it is definitely based on a modified class 150, which was a licensed German BR class 50 used here. The 151 had indeed a larger firebox and was somewhat heavier, faster and used an oil injector (the oil tank is seen attached on the back end of the tender, and the controls for it are on the fireman's side) among several other modifications. In the end it proved quite costly to build and maintain while only offering a small performance increase compared to the engine it was based upon. It was finally retired in the 1960s. a view of the fireman's controls
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here's a retrofitted Prussian P8 in Romania, a German-built superheater from 1906 that was later re-classified as BR 38 in Germany. It was a passanger train that was built up until about World War II. could top at around 62 mph. Prussian express engines have a thing for using driving wheels to support the firebox and cabin, which is the same here.

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  by Eliphaz
 
Please bring what you've got.
I am very interested in that area.
  by LZ18
 
Will do. I'd post more often but my posts here take several hours/days to get approved.
  by johnthefireman
 
The December 2014 copy of The Railway Magazine from UK has an article on the last surviving commercial steam in Europe, at four separate industrial sites around Tuzla in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Apparently a number of former Class 52 2-10-0 Kriegsloks can still be seen working on a daily basis.