• East River Tunnels Thread

  • This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.
This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by Ken W2KB
 
west point wrote: Wed May 19, 2021 2:09 pm High voltage power lines on racks only. Too easily for emergencies causing lines insulation to no longer meet insulation specs. It would probably not be in first 10 years but later. Too easily for insulation to get nicked and I would not like to be that close to 12 - 12.5 Kv lines as they would be used as a hand rail to stay away from a burning car or motor.

Do not like some safety analysis that have been done for these repairs. There would be liability issues that Amtrak can not afford to take. As far as waiting for power to be turned off. There will be situations where evacuees cannot wait for that to happen.

Even with the high voltage lines in non conducting conduit that would melt at about 500 F. If in metal conduit grounded the ground can be too easily become disconnected. Then it can be a shocking experience. And yes it happened to me getting about 277 volts not nice. cannot imagine what 12.5 Kv AC would do,
Agree 100% based upon my electric utility work experience. That said, my employer's transmission line personnel routinely perform live line maintenance at up to 500,000 Volts, from helicopters and bucket trucks. They actually bond onto a conductor and their bodies are energized at that same 500,000 Volts as the conductor cables. That works fine for them but in the tunnels the proximity to ground would be fatal.