• Dynamic braking preferred, but.........

  • General discussion about railroad operations, related facilities, maps, and other resources.
General discussion about railroad operations, related facilities, maps, and other resources.

Moderator: Robert Paniagua

  by jg greenwood
 
We're all aware that dynamic braking is the preferred braking method for all the obvious reasons; it saves fuel, reduces wear and tear on related equipment, eliminates the possibility of sticking brakes, etc. However, when the right-of-way is so hammered that having the slack bunched is just asking for a train separation due to the pin-lifters flying up, the most preferred method is out the window. This happened to us yesterday; lead unit "broke away" from the trailing unit and the train account of the above mentioned reason. Luckily, the chains were "jury rigged" and nothing was damaged, with the exception of the jumper-cable. Yes, by all means, follow the rules, unless...........

  by CN_Hogger
 
Just curious, what RR do you work for? How exactly did the pin lifter fly up?

  by Santa Fe Sucks
 
CN_Hogger wrote:Just curious, what RR do you work for? How exactly did the pin lifter fly up?
Yeah, I've never heard of the pin lifter flying up before.

  by jg greenwood
 
Employed by the Illinois Central. When the slack is bunched, as in dynamics, and the road bed is in terrible condition, it's not uncommon to experience train separations. The pin lifter will come up account of mud-holes, low spots, soft spots, bouncing up/down. If you've never heard of this happening, then congrats for operating over well maintained track!

  by Santa Fe Sucks
 
jg greenwood wrote:Employed by the Illinois Central. When the slack is bunched, as in dynamics, and the road bed is in terrible condition, it's not uncommon to experience train separations. The pin lifter will come up account of mud-holes, low spots, soft spots, bouncing up/down. If you've never heard of this happening, then congrats for operating over well maintained track!
Well our track isn't the best either, but it's the first time I've heard of such a thing! IC must be really bad (that's what I've heard from some of our old heads).

  by jg greenwood
 
Santa Fe Sucks wrote:
jg greenwood wrote:Employed by the Illinois Central. When the slack is bunched, as in dynamics, and the road bed is in terrible condition, it's not uncommon to experience train separations. The pin lifter will come up account of mud-holes, low spots, soft spots, bouncing up/down. If you've never heard of this happening, then congrats for operating over well maintained track!
Well our track isn't the best either, but it's the first time I've heard of such a thing! IC must be really bad (that's what I've heard from some of our old heads).
When you hammer the right-of-way with 15-20,000 ton coal trains on a daily basis, and are too........frugal to maintain said right-of-way, well-----enough said!

  by GN 599
 
We run on mostly jointed rail between K Falls and Keddie CA and it happens too much. Two weeks ago it happened to me coming down the hill toward Westwood, the train stopped about 7 cars from hitting us. On the way home just this last Wednesday heading home we went into emergency while I was copying a track warrant. We had a seperation between forty cars deep because ot the same thing. Unfortunatley last week a crew working heading for Keddie had the lead unit come off but the rest of the train caught them and hit them at about 30mph, didnt get hurt toobad. Then yesterday at about 4am a northbound went into the house track at Bieber at 49mph going over the derail into a string of parked cars scattering them, the 6 locomotives and a good chunk of the head end. The engineer suffered a fractured back and the conductor was banged up but both survived. Then yesterday afternoon in blizzard conditions two hi rails hit head on everyone got banged up but survived. Talk about a run of bad luck. My terminal was almost a year injury free too.
  by SD Shortline
 
On the DSRC, trees have been known to lift cut levers.