• Distinct lack of GE's in Preservation (not counting critters!)

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: MEC407, AMTK84

  by AussieAlco
 
I wonder what can be done about this issue? There are many types of GE locos not represented in preservation. while I don't think it is realistic to think a museum would try to preserve one of each type, it wouldn't be out of the question to think one of each surviving types could be displayed at various locations around the country.
Now my view on preservation is thus; it is NOT preserved if it is a for profit tourist line (they have to have a mind-set like a shortline). Conway and New Hope & Ivy don't fit the bill (NH&I have just scrapped 6 axle C30-7)
The owner/ operator needs to be 501 group.

At this stage, these are the only types preserved;
U23B
U25B
U28B
U30B
U36B

U23C
U25C
U28C
U30C
U34CH

B30-7

B32-8
B40-8

You may notice there are no 6 axle Dash 7s or Dash 8s in the list.

Just sayin....
Wes
  by Allen Hazen
 
I think the rarity of preserved large GE diesels may be related to something mentioned in a string about why GE locomotives tended to be retired much earlier than EMD: GE offered generous trade-in terms, so railroads tended to trade them in on newer models rather than keeping them OR donating them to museums.

From your list, it seems as if no U18B have been preserved, which seems a pity.

And, though it pains me as a GE locomotive fan to admit it, a lot of GE models are very similar visually: if you have seen a preserved U34CH, for example, you have a good idea what a U33C or U36C would look like even though examples of those models haven't been preserved. Sniff.
  by eolesen
 
Looking on Ozark, Dash 8's still have a retail value in the six figures.... makes it tough to argue for a donation on a running locomotive.

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

  by AussieAlco
 
eolesen wrote: Sat Feb 13, 2021 1:16 pm Looking on Ozark, Dash 8's still have a retail value in the six figures.... makes it tough to argue for a donation on a running locomotive.
Of course you are correct, but if a loco is going to a museum, who says it has to be operable? While it would be nice, there are plenty going to scrap which have no 6 figure resale value- only scrap value less scrapping charges and probably site clean-up costs.

Wes
  by MEC407
 
Allen Hazen wrote: Sat Feb 13, 2021 3:07 am From your list, it seems as if no U18B have been preserved, which seems a pity.
Agreed.

Having attempted to save a U18B, I can say from experience that it's much more difficult than it seems.

Fundraising for this sort of thing is extremely hard, even in a good economy. Part of the problem is that you're competing against other preservation projects for donations.

When I was trying to save a Maine Central U18B, other groups elsewhere in the country were soliciting funds to save an Amtrak F40PH, a Santa Fe SDP40F, an E-Unit, an Alco PA, and several steam locomotives. There was no way I could compete with that, especially in the very limited amount of time I was given: Guilford had the U18B up for sale and the scrap companies had cash-in-hand; Guilford wasn't going to hold it for me while I tried to raise funds, and I certainly don't blame them for that.

But I don't think most people realize just how hard it is, especially if it's a locomotive that only has limited and regional appeal (as opposed to broad national appeal, as was the case with the Amtrak and Santa Fe units). It's also a lot easier to raise funds for locomotives that are seen as pretty or beautiful, like E-Units and PAs.