• Distance between telephone-telegtraph poles

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by conductorbob
 
Was there a specific distance between telephone poles on the Danbury branch as verses the Maybrook main line? When I was working as a conductor on the New haven division main line, including the Danbury branch,I don't remember. On the former NYC side, I think they were 40' apart on the West Shore and on the Mohwk divisions. I can recall telling the engine crews to count so many pole and stop when working the division locals. (before radios). Any help in this matter would be a big help. Thanks Bob
  by Noel Weaver
 
conductorbob wrote:Was there a specific distance between telephone poles on the Danbury branch as verses the Maybrook main line? When I was working as a conductor on the New haven division main line, including the Danbury branch,I don't remember. On the former NYC side, I think they were 40' apart on the West Shore and on the Mohwk divisions. I can recall telling the engine crews to count so many pole and stop when working the division locals. (before radios). Any help in this matter would be a big help. Thanks Bob
There have not been pole lines on the New Haven and successors in a long, long time. The New Haven did away with them
in the Hartford District I think in 1963 or 1964. The rest of the railroad followed maybe in 1965 or so. After that time, the
poles came down or fell down fast and the wires that were not removed for their scrap value were stolen just as quickly.
What I referred to above as the Hartford District was generally the former Hartford Division and included terminals in
Springfield, Hartford and Waterbury all of which had telephone switchboards and telephone operators until the dial system
was put into use as I stated above. The dial system allowed the railroad to get rid of their telephone lines, maintainers and
telephone operators which saved the railroad a lot of money and made for a drastic improvement in telephone services
between points. It was apparently cheaper to use leased bell system lines than to maintain thier own phone lines in the 60's.
At least in the electric zone we used cat poles sometimes but nothing else.
Noel Weaver
  by conductorbob
 
Thanks for the answer Noel. The poles I was refering to are seen on Rt84 westbd heading toward Brewster. Like I said, I was just interested if they were spaced the same amount of feet between each other. Thanks Bob
  by CVRA7
 
During this past spring, most of the lineside poles were removed along the New Haven-Hartford-Springfield line, as part of a clean up campaign (many old signal relay cases also were removed, this project just being completed in the Berlin area). Most of this main line had communication lines - 3 or more crossarms on each pole - on one side of the right of way, the high and low voltage signal lines on the other, usually a 4 pin crossarm on top and one or two 10 pin crossarms below. Two of the high voltage lines were for the cab signals, which were deactivated c. 1975. To the best of my knowledge the low voltage lines wet out of use when the former Automatic Block Signal system was replaced when the 2nd track was largely abandoned, and the 2 remaining high voltage wires were in use up to around the turn of the century (the recent one).
There are a few poles remaining south of the Farmington Ave undergrade bridge, both sides, comm and signal lines.
  by Engineer Spike
 
When I worked on Burlington Northern, one conductor used to time the poles. He had figured out how many poles per mile, then did the math. He checked the speed this way so he did not have to wait for the measured mile.