• DASH 9 trucks and axles

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by Allen Hazen
 
I think that having a continuous axle is almost universal in rail vehicles. Since the wheels are fixed on the axle, this means there is inevitably a bit of wheel-slip going around a curve.
Possible exceptions:
(i) Talgo passenger cars may have wheels that can rotate independently: I recall reading somewhere that this was part of theoriginal (1950s) Talgo design.
(ii) Modern low-floor tram cars often have the wheels on the two sides mounted on separate stub axles. This makes it possible to have the floor below the level of the center of the wheel, making access from ground level easier.
The locomotive in your pictures seems to have suffered severe damage! I hope there was no one in the cab when it happened.
  by Allen Hazen
 
After posting, I read the comments on the pictures you linked to: the locomotive pictured was not the lead unit, the cab was not occupied, and there were apparently no major injuries.

  by Petz
 
As far as i see on the picture the whole axle and the bearings had been removed, i think that the parts can be seen inside the trucks are the brake shoes.

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
The first photo is obviously taken at the wreck sight, with the crane in the background, and the ROW clearly visible. The second shot shows the unit, after it has been moved to another location, and the axle has been reinstalled. It's not broken off, as the pair of wheels are clearly seen. Keep asking, Keep asking......... Might be quicker, to just look for yourself, instead of "inquiring" yet again, Terry................. :(
  by dash7
 
Allen Hazen wrote:After posting, I read the comments on the pictures you linked to: the locomotive pictured was not the lead unit, the cab was not occupied, and there were apparently no major injuries.
thats a relief it sure looks bad!!! its amazing the fuel tank did'nt explode! cheers, :wink: dash7

  by jgallaway81
 
Dear Golden-Arm, A polite 'BACK OFF' is to you.

I'm glad I don't visit any of your forums very often!

As for the wreck, did you ever pause to consider that just perhaps the axle may have shattered?

If you yourself had taken the time to look at the picture, it appears that the pockets for the journal box springs are cracked and/or destroyed.

Since the traction motor and gear house sit between the wheels within the frame, and the picture shows considerable destruction to the conductor's side, yet reveals surprisingly sparse damage to the engineer's side, it would be my hypothesis that there was sufficient impact force to create the forces necessary to break the axle near/at the housing and send it flying, while simultaneously leaving the other side battered but intact.