• B&M (Fitchburg) line from Eagle Bridge to Mechanicsville

  • Discussion relating to the pre-1983 B&M and MEC railroads. For current operations, please see the Pan Am Railways Forum.
Discussion relating to the pre-1983 B&M and MEC railroads. For current operations, please see the Pan Am Railways Forum.

Moderator: MEC407

  by eddiebear
 
The Hoosac Tunnel and the railroad through it was owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for a number of years. This was a very political project and after bailing out some railroads and contractors from bankruptcy time and again, the Commonwealth took title to everything and eventually completed the project. The Troy and Greenfield Railroad was run under an operating contract by the Vermont and Massachusetts which was leased to the Fitchburg which then managed all of the properties, Boston to Troy. But the Commonwealth owned about a 40 mile railroad and in theory if you could get to the Commonwealth's property, you too could probably contract to use it.
The Boston, Hoosac Tunnel and Western was chartered to build from the Massachusetts/Vermont border, across that southwestern corner of Vermont, into New York, parallel to the Troy and Boston for some miles, heading west at Johnsonville to the Mohawk River at Rotterdam and on to Buffalo. Actual construction made it to Rotterdam. Beyond there, the West Shore used the right-of-way surverys. The BHT & W wound up in Fitchburg hands eventually.
The right-of-way from Eagle Bridge to Johnsonville (I think those are the right stations) was so badly damaged in the November, 1927 floods which devastated the Rutland and wiped out most of the Central Vermont, that it was not rebuilt in place. Instead the second main was constructed on the right-of-way of the Troy and Boston.
When both main tracks were in place between the Mass.-Vt. line and Johnsonville, left handed operation was conducted between Hoosick Junction and Johnsonville.
The Fitchburg issued $20 million in securities to acquire the Hoosac Tunnel and Troy and Greenfield Railroad in the 1890s.