• Anyone got Hunts Point track diagrams?

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by BM6569
 
Hi all,

I was trying to figure out the Hunts Point trackage where it branches off the New Haven line and heads east by the water.

I have been looking on bing maps and historicaerials.com but still have questions. Does anyone have an old track diagram showing the sidings and how far the trackage went.

If you follow the line on bing maps, it ends at the intersection of Food Center Drive and Farragut St but on the aerials site, it shows it went father than that. How much farther?

What customers/service is left on the line? When was the line finished? Did it end at the Hunts Point Cooperative Market?

Thanks
  by Noel Weaver
 
The switch on track six did not exist until this line was built to the Hunts Point Market. It was a stub end affair with a
runaround track or maybe even more than one. It has been many years since I have been in there but it seems to me
that there were three different buildings that we switched. At the time the New Haven and in at least the early period of
Penn Central had a yardmaster there and maybe a yard clerk as well. We used to handle a huge amount of cars there but
today I think it is only a shadow of what it was in the late 60's.
The city of New York paid for the switch, trackage and buildings, the New Haven probably paid rent to occupy space in
Building C for the yardmaster and a crew room.
Just an estimate on my part but I would guess the facility opened to rail service in 1967.
Although the tracks and facilities were new, I never liked working this yard and avoided it if it was possible to do so.
Noel Weaver
  by Otto Vondrak
 
BM6569 wrote:I was trying to figure out the Hunts Point trackage where it branches off the New Haven line and heads east by the water.s
What year?

-otto-
  by Noel Weaver
 
Otto Vondrak wrote:
BM6569 wrote:I was trying to figure out the Hunts Point trackage where it branches off the New Haven line and heads east by the water.s
What year?

-otto-
Otto, The switch to the Hunts Point Market has always been in the exact same place, a point between Westchester Avenue
and Hunts Point Stations. It is a trailing point eastbound off what was track 6.
There have been some changes in that general area which I noticed last November enroute from Berlin, CT. to New York.
Noel Weaver
  by Statkowski
 
It originally had a rebuilt DERS-3 (FM H-16-44), No. 593, to handle the traffic - too much for a DEY-7 (EMD SW-1200).
  by Noel Weaver
 
Statkowski wrote:It originally had a rebuilt DERS-3 (FM H-16-44), No. 593, to handle the traffic - too much for a DEY-7 (EMD SW-1200).
Henry, the 590's came to New York because the traffic to Hunts Point was too much for a 0900 class. The 640's had no
problem with the Hunts Point moves and were often used on these moves. Problem was that there were simply not enough
of them to allow more than two at any time in Oak Point.
The 590's by the mid to late 60's had seen better days and the 640's were a better engine in all respects. An engine that was
able to handle the 100 plus car drags for the humps at Cedar Hill could handle the 40 or 50 car drags for the market.
Noel Weaver
  by Statkowski
 
One morning it took a 640 five tries to get across the plant at New Rochelle Junction from a stop at the home board. It only had 20 cars.
  by BM6569
 
Otto Vondrak wrote:
BM6569 wrote:I was trying to figure out the Hunts Point trackage where it branches off the New Haven line and heads east by the water.s
What year?

-otto-
I'd say in the 70's. I would like to see a good map or track diagram, that shows the track after all track was on place and before stuff started to become abandoned.

Did traffic from the market get moved back to Oak Point before going to Cedar Hill? That must have been an interesting move with all that freight.

Warren
  by Noel Weaver
 
Statkowski wrote:One morning it took a 640 five tries to get across the plant at New Rochelle Junction from a stop at the home board. It only had 20 cars.
New Rochelle could be a nasty spot under certain circumstances. This is not a reflection on the engine but rather that the
railroad ran the wheels off these things, especially in New York. Sand was an issue at time but the engine had the power
to do the job.
Noel Weaver
  by Noel Weaver
 
BM6569 wrote:
Otto Vondrak wrote:
BM6569 wrote:I was trying to figure out the Hunts Point trackage where it branches off the New Haven line and heads east by the water.s
What year?

-otto-
I'd say in the 70's. I would like to see a good map or track diagram, that shows the track after all track was on place and before stuff started to become abandoned.

Did traffic from the market get moved back to Oak Point before going to Cedar Hill? That must have been an interesting move with all that freight.

Warren
The cars out of the market always went to Oak Point in a drag to be switched into a train for Cedar Hill or in Penn Central
and beyond Selkirk.
The only through move involving Hunts Point was after the end of the New Haven a job from Selkirk would come into the
yard at Oak Point and make a cut, the head end cars were markets and the road crew and power would pull them up track
6 east of the switch where a market engine would open the switch and tie on to the cars to pull them in to the market.
After the yard engine cleared the switch, the road crew would return to Selkirk with the road freight locomotives to tie up.
Very early in the Penn Central period, probably 1969, the Hunts Point cars were routed through Selkirk. These cars came
from the west anyway and it was far shorter, faster and cheaper to just run them down to Oak Point from Selkirk rather
than through Cedar Hill.
Noel Weaver
Noel Weaver