• Amtrak Gateway Tunnels

  • This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.
This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by Jeff Smith
 
Project manager chosen: Northjersey.com
A consequential contract is approved to kick-start the Gateway rail tunnel project

The Gateway Development Commission board approved an agreement with its project delivery partner Wednesday — awarding what is arguably one of the single most consequential contracts required to deliver the $16.1 billion Hudson River tunnels project.

A joint venture of Parsons Corporation, Arcadis of New York Inc. and Mace North America Limited — what will be known as MPA Delivery Partners — was chosen from a shortlist of three options to provide project management for the program, which includes building a new two-track rail tunnel under the Hudson between North Jersey and Manhattan and then rehabilitating the 110-year-old two-track tube still in use, which was seriously damaged by Superstorm Sandy in 2012.

MPA Delivery Partners will be "the arms and legs" that enable the Gateway Development Commission to "continue to move this project in high gear as we prepare for heavy construction to start," commission co-chairs Balpreet Grewal-Virk and Alicia Glen said in a joint statement.
...
  by west point
 
It will be important to see how fast actual construction starts. As well the first construction speeds. That will tell a lot.
  by lensovet
 
Parsons parsons. How I wish we didn't have 3-4 global companies controlling every single infrastructure project.

Parsons/Tutor Perini, AECOM/Skanska, who else is left?
  by eolesen
 
Austin, Walsh, Bechtel, Arcadia, Stantec...

Sent from my SM-S911U using Tapatalk

  by Jeff Smith
 
Grant application sent: NJ.com
Gateway Tunnel project is one step closer to getting massive federal grant

The $16 billion Gateway Tunnel project is a decision away from receiving a record-setting $6.8 billion federal grant.

The Gateway Development Commission, the bi state agency overseeing design and building of the tunnel, submitted the final documents needed for the Federal Transit Administration to decide on awarding the grant.

“On March 30, we submitted the last documents to the FTA for us to reach a full-funding grant agreement,” Kris Kolluri, Gateway Development Commission CEO, said at the commission’s Tuesday meeting. “We are on track to secure all the funding for the tunnel.”
...
  by west point
 
All these grant announcements are getting old. Every "important" POL has to get his half penny's worth in.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Possibly this video has been previously posted in this epic, and maybe it does not add to the body of knowledge at this topic. But failing either, here goes:

  by Jeff Smith
 
"All Systems Go: New York Times
$16 Billion Hudson River Tunnel Project Gets Final Green Light

An agreement for the federal government to pay for most of the $16 billion project means the long-delayed plan is “all systems go,” Senator Chuck Schumer of New York said.

The planners of the $16 billion rail tunnel project known as Gateway said they passed the “point of no return” on Tuesday when the federal government told Congress that it would provide an additional $6.88 billion to the project.

The federal grant — the most ever provided to a mass-transit infrastructure project in the country — was the final piece of the funding puzzle for the long-delayed tunnel between New Jersey and Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan.

It gives planners of the sprawling project the green light to hire engineering and construction companies to start boring through a cliff in North Bergen, N.J., and under the Hudson River.

That work could begin as soon as this year and is scheduled to be completed in 2035, said Kris Kolluri, the chief executive of the Gateway Development Commission.
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  by lpetrich
 
There is an odd aspect of the planned tunnel route. Judging from diagrams in Home - Gateway Program and elsewhere, the route will be curved southward, with the ends near the existing tunnel ends and the middle further south. Like this:

NY
north <- |) -> south
NJ

| = existing
) = new

I haven't found any stated reason for why they plan to do that instead of going parallel to the existing tunnel.
  by eolesen
 
There is less risk/impact to the existing tunnels by taking the southerly swing. There may have been some other advantages on the NJ side as well.
  by Greg
 
eolesen wrote: Tue Jun 18, 2024 1:38 am There is less risk/impact to the existing tunnels by taking the southerly swing. There may have been some other advantages on the NJ side as well.
Avoiding Jimmy Hoffa.
  by Jeff Smith
 
^winner.

Aren't they using the ARC portals already built on the Joisey side?
  by amtrakowitz
 
There were portals built for THE Tunnel?

I remember they “broke ground”, but I also seem to remember NJ state funding was pulled not long after that.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Q&A: https://www.nj.com/opinion/2024/06/the- ... utType=amp

Snips:
Q. But longer term, your fellow rail riders wonder: What kind of contingencies must you make if someone other than Joe Biden occupies the White House next January?

A. As a practical matter and a legal matter, once the federal government signs a full funding grant agreement, they have never, ever gone back on it because it’s legally binding -- on all parties, which now includes New York, New Jersey, the Port Authority, Amtrak and the federal government. Everybody is essentially saying, “We are now going to do this.”

That full commitment has eluded this region for almost 30 years. So, we are now bound by that agreement, and that’s the certainty that we need – regardless of what happens politically. No person, elected or otherwise, could take a project this important -- one that’s going to create 95,000 jobs and keep the nation’s economy going – and mess with it.
...
Q. So many major projects -- East Side Access and Big Rig come to mind -- are notorious for going over budget and off-schedule. What is to prevent the tunnel project from doing the same?

A. Three things. One, we’ve made sure we’ve understood the interface risk between various component parts of the project, which is the biggest driver of costs and has the biggest impact on schedule. Number two, we have tried to make sure we have built in a substantial contingency -- both from cost and schedule, within the budget that we have, so we can anticipate and address challenges. Third, do we have the proper implementation strategy for the entire project? What we now have in place is the collective commitment and effort by the Port Authority, Amtrak, New Jersey Transit, and the GDC to implement this project. We have the resources to do it.

Usually, one of those three things goes terribly wrong. What is the one risk that remains? The one that exists in any mega project: The unknown-unknowns. For example, if there is something in the Hudson River that nobody ever saw coming -- and it was just impossible to have ever known – and we have to stop construction? Yeah, that could happen. But what we try to do is predict and assess the current condition and what we’re going to likely see and try to prepare for an unknown-unknown to the best of our ability.
...
Q. Fast forward to your estimated 2035 timetable: We talk a lot about how new tunnels will substantially increase capacity, but can you project how this project will streamline New Jersey rail service overall?

A. The foundational reason for this project is to make sure we have a resilient system. Right now, the commuter -- through no fault of New Jersey Transit -- can be delayed by an hour or two or have his or her train cancelled because of the age of the infrastructure. What we’re trying to do is provide a level of certainty, which is all the riders ever want. They want comfort and certainty.

That’s what this project is, at its essence: a reliable, redundant set of tunnels that can make sure a commuter who gets on the morning train can get to his or her place of work and return home on time. That’s why I always say that we’re building more than portals of concrete and rebar. We’re building portals of opportunity.
...
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
amtrakowitz wrote: Wed Jun 19, 2024 12:23 am There were portals built for THE Tunnel?

I remember they “broke ground”, but I also seem to remember NJ state funding was pulled not long after that.
My memory also concurs with Mr. Amtrakowitz.

Before Gov. Christie, who let's be honest, was in "the highwaymen's pocket" pulled the plug, there was the "Hard Hats (worn by people who never had or never will again) and Golden Shovels photo op", as well as maybe 1000 yards of excavation, if even that.

But I think all here agree ARC was deeply flawed. Building an underground (some 100' down - just like the L I R R's GCT-E) was deeply flawed. First, the separation of Amtrak (MNR apparently as well) and NJT operations simply reduced the utility that a "union station" affords. And with the plan to take the two existing tunnels out of service for some two years for a top to bottom rebuild so they too will last for another 100 years would have been greatly complicated.

But why it had to take ten years after scrapping ARC, to get Gateway in place so that no anti-rail Administration could whack it, simply escapes me.

I guess that is simply the price we pay for having our Democratic Republic.
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