• Alco to be scrapped?

  • Discussion about the M&E, RVRR and SIRR lines of New Jersey, and also the Maine Eastern operation in Maine. Official web site can be found here: www.merail.com.
Discussion about the M&E, RVRR and SIRR lines of New Jersey, and also the Maine Eastern operation in Maine. Official web site can be found here: www.merail.com.

Moderators: GOLDEN-ARM, mikec, cjl330

  by Luther Brefo
 
Besides the fact that it is missing some lights and needs some sheet metal work what was wrong with this engine?

Is M&E starting to scrap everything they own?

  by RS115
 
It is my understanding that M&E never intended to run this unit - they bought it with the intention of salvaging good parts like the prime mover and eventually scrapping the rest. Same thing with the RS-11's - they never intended to run them all. They did the same, if you recall, with the C-424's - 4240 was used as a parts source to get the other ex-CP units running and eventually scrapped.

While many on this board would like every extant ALCO to be brought back to life the economics of that don't work on many levels. ALCO has been out of business for coming up on 40 years - it is unrealistic to thing these units will conitnue to survive in routine service indefinately. In fact I find (and I love them don't get me wrong here) the number in daily service in the Tri-State area to be pretty amazing considering their 'odd ball' status in the overall scheme of modern railroading.

No flames please.

  by Luther Brefo
 
I wasn't aware that their only purpose was as parts units. I guess it makes sense in the end, save some by killing the others. There is no easy or moral way to say that. :)

It just seemed for a moment there that M&E was in scrap-everything-mode.

FM will build and rebuild 251s though. As per their site anyways. They still have the 18 cylinder 251 on their site. If I recall correctly there was only one locomotive produced in that configuration for Canadian Pacific and it is now in a museum up there somewhere in Canada.

  by SIXX
 
The detailed inspection of 2029 after arrival at the M&E revealed that the unit could not be made useable without investing a great deal of capital and many, many man hours. In addition to cut & stolen power cable, the rectifier panels and their associated wiring were missing, the dynamic brake wiring was missing, the wiring from the main generator had been cut, additional wiring had been cut inside the control stand, the fan blades and eddy current clutch were missing, the turbo was seized and was a solid block of rust, the main gen was in poor condition and rusted up, the electrical cabinets had parts removed, and it had no batteries, horn or bell. Scrapping a locomotive is NOT something that the M&E takes lightly however it was obvious that attempting to repair this unit was going to be an exercise in throwing good money after bad.


636

  by Luther Brefo
 
SIXX wrote:The detailed inspection of 2029 after arrival at the M&E revealed that the unit could not be made useable without investing a great deal of capital and many, many man hours. In addition to cut & stolen power cable, the rectifier panels and their associated wiring were missing, the dynamic brake wiring was missing, the wiring from the main generator had been cut, additional wiring had been cut inside the control stand, the fan blades and eddy current clutch were missing, the turbo was seized and was a solid block of rust, the main gen was in poor condition and rusted up, the electrical cabinets had parts removed, and it had no batteries, horn or bell. Scrapping a locomotive is NOT something that the M&E takes lightly however it was obvious that attempting to repair this unit was going to be an exercise in throwing good money after bad.


636
Agreed. Seems like this engine went through some rough times.

  by oibu
 
Given the relative scarcity of the MLW C630 (There are only about 2-3 others left IIRC) perhaps the M&E could be persuaded to gut the unit for parts but leave it intact externally for preservation purposes? Could make a little tax writeoff if donated to a museum or other nonprofit, I'd imagine. If anyone else has similar thoughts or knows of any such thoughts within the M&E itself or within any preservation organizations, please share! There are only a handful of 6-motor Alcos/MLWs safely preserved, but a fair number of them are still either running or rusting here in the northeast-IMHO the time is now to start thinking ahead about how to make sure at least one example of each 630/636 model or major variant left to this world ends up in safe, caring hands. We Alco fans in the northeast have a golden opportunity on our hands right now, between the 2029, the active DL units, the LA&L units, and the NYS&W units- we should enjoy them now; but we should also take steps to ensure that when the bell eventually tolls for these beauties, some of them can enjoy their days in retirement as memorials to their fallen sisters, nostalgia for those who knew them, and time machines for those who were too late. If we wait until the dismantler's truck pulls up, it will be too late. Our Canadian friends have already preserved a small handful; but in the US, I know of only two 6-motor Centuries that are safely preserved.

Ok, I'll get down off my soapbox; but I do think that collectively, northeastern Alco/MLW fans have on their hands, or will at some time in the not unforseeable future, a unique opportunity that will be lost forever if we don't think ahead. It could be done by a few who each give a lot, or by a lot who each give a little (be it planning, dollars, or elbow grease); but it could certainly be done IF the plans are made and the cooperation is there.

Right now I'm just throwing this out in hopes that others will agree and thoughts will begin to jell. But I will also say that if it can be done, count me in for logistical assistance, modest financial input, and plenty of elbow grease!

  by njt4172
 
oibu wrote:Given the relative scarcity of the MLW C630 (There are only about 2-3 others left IIRC) perhaps the M&E could be persuaded to gut the unit for parts but leave it intact externally for preservation purposes? Could make a little tax writeoff if donated to a museum or other nonprofit, I'd imagine. If anyone else has similar thoughts or knows of any such thoughts within the M&E itself or within any preservation organizations, please share! There are only a handful of 6-motor Alcos/MLWs safely preserved, but a fair number of them are still either running or rusting here in the northeast-IMHO the time is now to start thinking ahead about how to make sure at least one example of each 630/636 model or major variant left to this world ends up in safe, caring hands. We Alco fans in the northeast have a golden opportunity on our hands right now, between the 2029, the active DL units, the LA&L units, and the NYS&W units- we should enjoy them now; but we should also take steps to ensure that when the bell eventually tolls for these beauties, some of them can enjoy their days in retirement as memorials to their fallen sisters, nostalgia for those who knew them, and time machines for those who were too late. If we wait until the dismantler's truck pulls up, it will be too late. Our Canadian friends have already preserved a small handful; but in the US, I know of only two 6-motor Centuries that are safely preserved.

Ok, I'll get down off my soapbox; but I do think that collectively, northeastern Alco/MLW fans have on their hands, or will at some time in the not unforseeable future, a unique opportunity that will be lost forever if we don't think ahead. It could be done by a few who each give a lot, or by a lot who each give a little (be it planning, dollars, or elbow grease); but it could certainly be done IF the plans are made and the cooperation is there.

Right now I'm just throwing this out in hopes that others will agree and thoughts will begin to jell. But I will also say that if it can be done, count me in for logistical assistance, modest financial input, and plenty of elbow grease!

Can't put it any simpler terms... I AGREE! :-D