• Acela II (Avelia Liberty): Design, Production, Delivery, Acceptance

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by cle
 
Will there be a new timetable to reflect any of the speed increases? Sounds as if they might be south of NY, as well as the classic 150+ sections of Acela in New England?
  by 8th Notch
 
The timetable is modified/updated in any number of ways periodically, so any speed modifications may show up on bulletin first or we could see a new timetable/G.O issued when the trainsets are closer to service. Amtrak is in the process of issuing IPads to T&E crews now so it should be a seamless transition depending on whether the paperless program is up and running fully.
  by daybeers
 
8th Notch wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 7:45 am The timetable is modified/updated in any number of ways periodically, so any speed modifications may show up on bulletin first or we could see a new timetable/G.O issued when the trainsets are closer to service. Amtrak is in the process of issuing IPads to T&E crews now so it should be a seamless transition depending on whether the paperless program is up and running fully.
Ooo fancy, surprised Amtrak's IT department can handle that :wink:
  by ExCon90
 
SEPTA's Silverliner Vs are equipped to receive Form Ds in the cab, but I don't think they're operational yet. (Hypothetical question: if a G. O. is received in the cab of an Acela or Regional, will the engineer have to wait until the next stop to read it? Still quicker than copying down and reading back.)
  by STrRedWolf
 
ExCon90 wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 8:37 pm SEPTA's Silverliner Vs are equipped to receive Form Ds in the cab, but I don't think they're operational yet. (Hypothetical question: if a G. O. is received in the cab of an Acela or Regional, will the engineer have to wait until the next stop to read it? Still quicker than copying down and reading back.)
I would think dispatch would set the signal to red at the next block, send the Form D to the cab (or tablet), and wait for the engineer to call up and confirm receipt and read the Form D back... or relay the form D back down to the engineer.

Same with Amtrak. Set the signals to stop and call up, send the G.O. down to the iPad and cab, wait for the engineer to read it back to dispatch or complain.
  by mcgrath618
 
ExCon90 wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 8:37 pm SEPTA's Silverliner Vs are equipped to receive Form Ds in the cab, but I don't think they're operational yet. (Hypothetical question: if a G. O. is received in the cab of an Acela or Regional, will the engineer have to wait until the next stop to read it? Still quicker than copying down and reading back.)
What are form Ds and G.Os?
  by 8th Notch
 
G.O is General Order and it’s issued periodically to summarize changes to the timetable. Form D is a mandatory directive issued by the train dispatcher, they contain numerous lines that can be used to issue movement authority or restrictions or anything else not covered in the rule book.

http://smartlocal586.org/documents/form ... FORM_D.pdf
  by 8th Notch
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Fri Jul 16, 2021 5:28 pm
ExCon90 wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 8:37 pm SEPTA's Silverliner Vs are equipped to receive Form Ds in the cab, but I don't think they're operational yet. (Hypothetical question: if a G. O. is received in the cab of an Acela or Regional, will the engineer have to wait until the next stop to read it? Still quicker than copying down and reading back.)
I would think dispatch would set the signal to red at the next block, send the Form D to the cab (or tablet), and wait for the engineer to call up and confirm receipt and read the Form D back... or relay the form D back down to the engineer.

Same with Amtrak. Set the signals to stop and call up, send the G.O. down to the iPad and cab, wait for the engineer to read it back to dispatch or complain.
Bingo, I know the tablets will have some type of acknowledgment for the engineer to complete when a Form D or TSRB is issued enroute, whether or not a stop to read and acknowledge will be required is still up for debate. By rule the dispatchers cannot signal a train up to or past a location where the train will be required to comply with a directive unless the directive has been issued to the train.
  by ExCon90
 
Can a dispatcher change an intermediate signal to red, or only a controlled home signal at a Controlled Point? Or under PTC can he simply alter the transmissions received by the train at any time and have it immediately reflected in the cab?
  by 8th Notch
 
An intermediate signal just refers to an interlocking with multiple controlled signals, the first signal governing entrance to the interlocking would be the home signal then the second one would be called the intermediate (both which are controlled by the dispatcher). A change in signal indication by the dispatcher would only be immediately reflected in the cab if the train was close to the interlocking or CP, the Dspr has no direct control over cab signals and the form of PTC used on the corridor (ACSES) does not communicate with the cab signals unless approaching a signal displaying stop at an interlocking.
  by RRspatch
 
ExCon90 wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 8:37 pm SEPTA's Silverliner Vs are equipped to receive Form Ds in the cab, but I don't think they're operational yet. (Hypothetical question: if a G. O. is received in the cab of an Acela or Regional, will the engineer have to wait until the next stop to read it? Still quicker than copying down and reading back.)
They were rolling this out on BNSF when I retired in 2017. Direct electronic transmission of Track Warrants and speed restrictions to the trains. This cut down greatly on missed repeats. Glad to see it's finally come to the corridor.
  by west point
 
This u tube had too items of interest.
1. Princeton Jct still has a temporarily installed platform over a track.
2. 1/2 of the runs used the forward pan. Not too much arching either pan front or pan rear.

  by STrRedWolf
 
8th Notch wrote: Fri Jul 16, 2021 11:23 pm An intermediate signal just refers to an interlocking with multiple controlled signals, the first signal governing entrance to the interlocking would be the home signal then the second one would be called the intermediate (both which are controlled by the dispatcher). A change in signal indication by the dispatcher would only be immediately reflected in the cab if the train was close to the interlocking or CP, the Dspr has no direct control over cab signals and the form of PTC used on the corridor (ACSES) does not communicate with the cab signals unless approaching a signal displaying stop at an interlocking.
That's my thinking as well. The dispatcher would signal at the start of block where it's affected... which would usually be at an interlocking.
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