Discussion relating to the past and present operations of the NYC Subway, PATH, and Staten Island Railway (SIRT).

Moderator: GirlOnTheTrain

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  by Rbts Stn
 
rr503 wrote:
Rbts Stn wrote:Are the "inclinators" before or after fare control?


(asking for a friend!)
After. :(
Dammit.

I mean, my friend said "dammit" when I told him.
  by Passenger
 
bellstbarn wrote:You must pay fare to ride the inclined elevators ...
That station is a tourist attraction I'd pay to look around even if I weren't going anywhere.
... "token booth" ...
The only one in the system that never sold tokens? :wink:
  by BobLI
 
I believe the station on Roosevelt island opebned after the token was replaced by the Metrocard. Please correct me if i'm wrong.
  by Kamen Rider
 
the three 63rd street stops (lex, Roosevelt, Queensbridge) opened in October 1989.

MetroCard was launched in 1994

The token was phased out in 2003.

If a booth was added to a location after that date, then it's never sold tokens ether.

For example, Willets Point has a ground level booth in front of Citi Field at the bottom of the stairs. that has never sold tokens ether.
  by Hamilton Express
 
The elevators at the main entrance of this station have been have karma. On and off, on and off...
  by Allan
 
[quote="I did not notice the Retail Concession Area. The MTA website says it's behind the Station Service Center.
The ride down on the escalator made me feel slightly like I was going to pitch forward. I tried to measure the speed of the handrail in relation to the speed of the steps. It seemed the same rate. A long time ago, I was told that downward escalators had handrails that pulled people slightly back, not forward.[/quote]

I had the same feeling riding down on the escalator.

You would think that with all the money spent they would have put at least one set of escalators between mezzanine & the platform.

I do find it a shame that the MTA couldn't do something with the platform in the LIRR yard (by track 28) so they could create a shuttle service between Penn Station and Javits Center. The 7 extension does nothing for those who are coming in via LIRR/NJT?Amtrak at Penn Station. That is where a lot of people come in from. It also doesn't do much for those who will eventually be living in those high priced buildings that are going up and have to go to Penn Station. They will have to make do with the M34 SBS,
  by railfan365
 
MTA can still run LIRR trains to the Hudson Yard platform. After all, the platform is there, there's a track going to it from an existing station nearby. Such a service can be established easily - even though MTA would figure out a way to make it take 5 years and cost 6 billion dollars.
  by Allan
 
railfan365 wrote:MTA can still run LIRR trains to the Hudson Yard platform. After all, the platform is there, there's a track going to it from an existing station nearby. Such a service can be established easily - even though MTA would figure out a way to make it take 5 years and cost 6 billion dollars.
I think closer to 7 years and 8 billion.

The platform is rather narrow. They would have to sacrifice one storage track to make it wide enough to handle a crowd of passengers (not to mention put in staircases etc).
  by Head-end View
 
First visit to the new station this afternoon. Quite an experience. Some good features and bad too. On the plus side, I like the very wide train platform, and the multiple wide stairwells leading to it though I agree with the above poster who asked why no escalators to the platform.

On the negative side, I too experienced an odd feeling riding down the long escalator thru that "tube" something like Bellstbarn described above. It was very disorienting to my sense of balance and visual perspective. Never experienced that before on an escalator. That "tube" it runs thru seemed a little claustrophobic too.

And I wondered why there is no stairwell parallel to the escalators like they have at the LIRR/34th St. entrance and at the WTC PATH Terminal. Some day one or more of those escalators will crap out and the stairs will be needed. And just having the elevators is not enough redundancy. A power failure in the station could knock both out. Then what?
  by rr503
 
What is the track config south of 34th?
NYCsubway.org still hasn't updated the ones that they have.
When I was there, I think I saw a crossover just south of the station, but I was too focused on the station itself to really pay attention.
  by Greg Moore
 
jackintosh11 wrote:Escalators have the amazing function of working as stairs during a power failure.
Unless like the DC Metro escalators they start to slide backwards with people on it.
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