• #14 Orange Line Cars 1400-1551 (From Red/Orange Procurement discussion)

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: CRail, sery2831

  by Commuterrail1050
 
The new cars have nothing to do with the vandalism. If it were to had been just them, service wouldn’t have been affected. They were all pulled anyways due to battery issues. This means that the older cars were the victims of being vandalized. That’s why service was slashed further that day. Does that make sense to everyone?
  by Rbts Stn
 
It makes sense. Hell, it's expected that there are going to be problems. There were witnesses to the vandalism, I hope they get caught and they figure out some form of restitution
  by Disney Guy
 
Why did out-of-service cars that got vandalized result in service being slashed further? Or did they have to be put back in service to meet car requirements with the new cars sidelined?

Battery charging technology may be mature but battery technology has been changing. Also, like train collision avoidance, and doors closing on passengers, new circumstances have cropped up periodically needing new fixes to be invented. Even building a battery in a different physical shape (to fit the space provided) has necessitated additional testing.

In recent years I have read of cell phones, watches, (motorized) skateboards, and even a city bus (not a cheap fare bus like Fung Wah) erupting in flames because of a defective or improperly charged battery.
  by BandA
 
If the existing design was so good, why did they have to redesign it AND increase the ventilation? Imagine if someone was standing on the platform when the battery exploded, throwing the compartment cover, metal shrapnel & burning bits of lithium metal in their face. It could have happened. Or if it happened when stuck in a tunnel which fills with smoke, 100s of people get smoke inhalation, they manage to evacuate but the subway car catches fire and is destroyed...

CRRC is the world's largest manufacturer of rolling stock, majority owned & controlled by the People's Republic of China government. According to wikipedia, they are under US sanctions as a supplier to the People's Liberation Army, and Americans are prohibited from owning any of their stock.

How can the world's largest manufacturer of rail cars, from the country that manufactures virtually all the batteries and all of the charging circuits, not have a bulletproof design for a battery & charging system? They must use them in China too...
  by jwhite07
 
It is quite likely that the battery and charging sub components are not manufactured by CRRC itself but are some of the many components which are outsourced to other suppliers, many of whom are American companies in order to comply with Buy American laws. For example, the troublesome trucks on these cars which caused the derailment at Wellington last year were manufactured by Bradken in St. Joseph, Missouri, U S of A.

“Lowest Bidder Syndrome”, installation error, one bad battery in the batch of otherwise good ones, shoddy QC, somebody accidentally plugged the blue wire into the green plug in a poorly lit corner at Wellington, who knows - that’s all being investigated. Point is, any number of things could have caused that battery explosion issue. It’s rather inconvenient but true that they don’t all definitively point right back at China.
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
jwhite07 wrote: Wed Jul 06, 2022 8:23 pm For example, the troublesome trucks on these cars which caused the derailment at Wellington last year were manufactured by Bradken in St. Joseph, Missouri.
From back issues of the ERA Bulletin, the 0700 Siemens cars had delivery delays as a result of the truck
manufacturer, Buckeye Steel (later Columbus Castings) in bankuptcy. The same GSI 70 trucks and company
would be involved in the Silverliner V debacle.
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