• #14 Orange Line Cars 1400-1551 (From Red/Orange Procurement discussion)

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: sery2831, CRail

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  by chrisf
 
Robert Paniagua wrote: Tue Nov 24, 2020 11:10 am I hope the new CRRC Orange Line traincars get here soon now that things have or will get back to normal with the railcar manufacturer
CRRC was way behind even before the pandemic. The order is expected to be at least 15 months late, and I don't see that improving as the pandemic surges once again. I'm not sure that CRRC's Massachusetts plant can be considered to be "back to normal" at this point.
  by Commuterrail1050
 
I don’t see any kind of normal happening until most people get vaccinated. Until then, I see this as a catch up game which will take time. How long? We will have to see what time says.
  by Pensyfan19
 
DOes anyone know if the latest pre-CRRC stock is still in service and not completely retired? Because...

https://www.trains.com/trn/news-reviews ... erailment/
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority has taken its new Orange Line and Red Line subway cars out of service as it investigates Tuesday’s low-speed derailment of a train with 100 passengers aboard. The Boston Herald also reports a bus bridge around the accident site at Wellingon station in Medford, Mass., between the Oak Grove and Sullivan stations, will remain in place for three weeks as MBTA crews repair a switch damaged in the derailment and perform other infrastructure work. MBTA Deputy Press Secretary Lisa Battison said the cars built in Springfield, Mass., by a subsidiary of Chinese equipment manufacturer CRRC are being removed from service “out of an abundance of caution … to allow vehicle engineers to perform a thorough analysis of the cars’ performance.” A total of four trainsets are being sidelined.
If not, then...
  by Disney Guy
 
On a model train or a toy train a truck (bogie) that is not fixed contacts the car body only at the kingpin. On a "real" train, going around a curve, the kingpin can't hold the car perfectly upright and the outside of the truck frame (specifically the outer end of the truck bolster) leans on the underside of the car body (specifically on a fixed bolster under the car). The truck must turn freely at all times, which is nearly true on a model train with just the kingpin attachment. But for the real train, a sliding bearing system is needed on each side of the kingpin to allow for the turning of the truck going around a curve. If the truck cannot turn freely, it of course derails. One system used in the past has a round bolster (actually think: pizza crust sections instead of a full circle) mounted horizontally under the car body and above the trucks. The truck bolster has little wheels at the outer ends to roll back and forth under the theoretically smooth and flat rim of this special car bolster.

At any rate, the problem mentioned for the new Red Line and Orange Line cars is that the trucks are not rotating freely enough.
  by bostontrainguy
 
From Trains:

MBTA Deputy General Manager Jeff Gonneville said tests on the cars have found that as their mileage increases, it takes increasing force to turn the truck frames, and that investigators are looking at a component known as a side bearer pad, which regulates rotational force on the truck.
  by typesix
 
Disney Guy wrote:On a model train or a toy train a truck (bogie) that is not fixed contacts the car body only at the kingpin. On a "real" train, going around a curve, the kingpin can't hold the car perfectly upright and the outside of the truck frame (specifically the outer end of the truck bolster) leans on the underside of the car body (specifically on a fixed bolster under the car).
You forgot to mention the PCC in your avatar uses the kingpin method.
  by typesix
 
Another article on the side bearer problem:

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/05/16/ ... foot-long/
The Boston Globe wrote:When one of the few new trains to have graced the Orange Line derailed in March and disrupted subway service for weeks, transit officials at first suggested it was unlikely the problem was caused by the vehicles themselves.

And since the derailment occurred along a section of track that was undergoing repairs, it seemed likely at the time that the culprit would be aging rails or a faulty switch, not brand-new train cars. Still, as a precaution, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority pulled all the new subway cars from service — four trainsets from the Orange Line and one from the Red Line — while investigating.

The caution, it turned out, was warranted. Following a series of tests, the MBTA last week revealed that the undersides of the new trains are not turning properly as they accumulate more miles — an effect that officials now say played a key role in the March 16 derailment.
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