Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Discussion relating to the past and present operations of the NYC Subway, PATH, and Staten Island Railway (SIRT).

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Passenger
Posts: 401
Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2008 3:08 pm
Location: Chicago

Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Post by Passenger »

Going by personal recollection only, back in the 1970s the wooden platforms were all replaced by concrete.

Two questions:

1) Why?

2) How much reworking of the steel structure was necessary to support the weight?

Thanks.

Allan
Posts: 422
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:10 am
Location: Bronx, NY

Re: Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Post by Allan »

Passenger wrote:Going by personal recollection only, back in the 1970s the wooden platforms were all replaced by concrete.

Two questions:

1) Why?

2) How much reworking of the steel structure was necessary to support the weight?

Thanks.
1) Concrete lasts longer than wood. Wood platforms can deteriorate rather quickly when exposed to rain and snow. Concrete ones hold up better (but can deteriorate too). Wood platforms are susceptible to catching fire (and some have), concrete ones are not.

2) I don't know but I am sure some reinforcement had to be done in some spots.

fishmech
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 3:33 pm

Re: Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Post by fishmech »

There's still plenty of wood flooring at elevated stations, stairs, mezzanines, transfer hallways, and so on. You can look through the gaps in them even.

R36 Combine Coach
Posts: 5518
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 8:51 pm

Re: Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Post by R36 Combine Coach »

Most elevated stations still have the mezzanines and staircases made of wood. They appear to be original from when they were built during the Dual Contracts in 1914-18.
Since my friend continues to chain smoke nonstop, she is probably an Alco.

Statkowski
Posts: 604
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 7:44 am
Location: Cherry Tree, Pa.

Re: Wooden platforms on elevated lines.

Post by Statkowski »

1) Concrete lasts longer than wood. Wood platforms can deteriorate rather quickly when exposed to rain and snow. Concrete ones hold up better (but can deteriorate too). Wood platforms are susceptible to catching fire (and some have), concrete ones are not.
Wood platforms are warmer to the feet than concrete platforms in the wintertime.

Don't know about concrete platforms, but they did have a concrete bridge burn down in Bellows Falls, Vermont once. Oil from the roadway soaked into the concrete, passing train underneath threw a spark. The result was expected.
Ex-NYNH&H SS Opr

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