tripod shots without a tripod

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RussNelson
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tripod shots without a tripod

Post by RussNelson » Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:48 pm

Of course, we all know that sometimes railroad officials get grumpy about tripods, and even monopods. Well, here's a clever idea which should work nearly as well, without causing concern on the part of officialdom: http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1041948/1 ... he_tripod/
Basically, you put a short 1/4-20 bolt and washer into your tripod hole, and then tie a string to it which you step on and pull tight.

dj_paige
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Post by dj_paige » Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:21 pm

Well, the price is right! It sure beats buying expensive image stabilization lenses. So, has anyone actually tried taking photos using this device? Can you post some examples?
Paige
"If you get the chance to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance" -- LeAnn Rimes
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pennsy
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Post by pennsy » Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:24 pm

Hi Russ,

Excellent suggestion. I have talked about it for some time now on several threads. Can't claim to be the inventor, since it is standard operating procedure with professional photographers such as the one that trained me. It is in their textbooks.

I will add the other part of the suggestion; arrange for the monopod to fit into an empty 35 mm film cassette holder. You tape that to your camera strap, or in my case, the strap for the camera case. I also have a second film cassette holder taped to that strap, and it holds a spare roll of film. That way you don't run out of film either.

Again, as long as the string is kept taut, the camera will NOT shake. As an aside, should you be using a long lens, attach the monopod to the mounting screw hole on the long lens, for futher stability, and hold the entire camera by the long lens, in the palm of your hand. The center of gravity of the assembly is within the long lens.

dj_paige
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Post by dj_paige » Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:14 pm

Example of images taken with and without the $1 tripod (not train related).

1/20s f4.0 ISO 500, Nikon 70-300G lens handheld, 100% crop
Image


1/20s f4.0 ISO 500 Nikon 70-300G lens using $1 tripod, 100% crop
Image

That's quite a noticeable improvement at 1/20s using what is a relatively heavy and long lens. I think if I go out and buy a better string (one that is less stretchy), the results would be even more dramatic.
Paige
"If you get the chance to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance" -- LeAnn Rimes
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uhaul

Post by uhaul » Sat Jan 19, 2008 1:24 pm

Very enterprising indeed.

pennsy
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Post by pennsy » Sat Jan 19, 2008 2:09 pm

Not bad for an ISO/ ASA of 500. The grain is pretty good. I might also mention that the string monopod allows the ability to follow motion. With a reasonably high shutter speed and some fast film, such photographs will easily make the magazines. The one that comes to mind is an ice skater braking on the ice, with ice particles flying towards the lens. High shutter speed really fast film and you can pick out the individual pieces of ice coming towards you. The photographer, a professional and my mentor, placed his hand over the lens after taking the shot. The particles of ice went all over us.

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