Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: gprimr1, mtuandrew

Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby Station Aficionado » Fri Sep 16, 2016 5:08 pm

(Note to mods: wasn't sure if this was the right forum, but none of the others seemed to fit).

Train stations (in or out of service) have been lost for many reasons. I recently posted some info in the Midwest Forum about Dayton Union Station, which was demolished in 1964 to make way for a street. That has made me wonder how many stations were lost to street or highway construction--that is because cars and trucks were privileged over trains. Here's a partial list off the top of my head:

Grand Rapids Union Station--demolished in 1958 to make way for highway
Savannah Union Station--razed in 1962 for freeway ramp
Syracuse NYC Station (partial)--tracks and and platforms removed in early '60's for a freeway
Dayton Union Station--demolished 1964 for a street

All of these were functioning stations when closed and demolished.

What other stations were lost so that more concrete could be poured?
Metro: Once an effective transit system in the Washington, DC area; now no longer extant.
Station Aficionado
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:15 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby The EGE » Fri Sep 16, 2016 8:55 pm

Lowell Union Station (Middlesex Street Station) was destroyed for highway ramps in the 1950s.

The Massachusetts Turnpike Extension (opened 1964-65) occupies much of the former Boston & Albany ROW. A number of very nice stations were razed: Auburndale (designed by H.H. Richardson), West Newton, Newtonville, Newton Corner, Faneuil, and Brighton (also Richardson). Along with the conversion of the Highland Branch to trolley a few years before (a worthy project, but the demolition of stations to make tiny parking lots was idiotic), that wiped out most of the B&A's remaining suburban stations from the 19th century.

Honorable mention: the former site of Newburyport station is now occupied by apartments, but the construction of the Route 1 highway across the street certainly contributed to its decline and eventual demolition.

Providence Union Station is no longer used as a train station in large part due to the construction of a highway interchange; Amtrak and MBTA passengers now use a dingy bunker nearby. But Union Station has been preserved and restored, so it's in no danger.
"Give me an unobstructed right-of-way and I'll show them how to move the earth!"
User avatar
The EGE
 
Posts: 2453
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 6:16 pm
Location: Waiting for the C Branch

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby Station Aficionado » Fri Sep 16, 2016 10:07 pm

Very interesting. I knew that the turnpike took a big swath of the B&A row near Boston, but didn't realize so many stations fell.

Birmingham Terminal Station (modeled on the Hagia Sophia) also gets honorable mention. It was razed in 1969 primarily to provide space for an office complex. But the offices were never built, and the land was later used for a highway.
Metro: Once an effective transit system in the Washington, DC area; now no longer extant.
Station Aficionado
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:15 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby bdawe » Fri Sep 16, 2016 10:28 pm

I'm trying to think of western examples -

While Oakland's 16th Street Station (ex SP) still stands, it has been separated from the Mainline by I-880 in the 1990s, after the route to the South-East was destroyed during the 1989 Earthquake.
B. Dawe's map of routes and urban populations https://brendandawe.carto.com/viz/80b9d ... /embed_map NOW updated with 2016 Canadian Populations
User avatar
bdawe
 
Posts: 508
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2015 1:06 pm
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby Station Aficionado » Sat Sep 17, 2016 9:29 am

The west (at least the big cities--Canada and US) did better at holding on to its stations. The Great Northern Station in Vancouver, the original SP station in San Francisco and the CP and CN (pre-office tower) stations in Edmonton are major losses that come to mind, but I don't know if any of them were for highway/street construction.

Another midwestern example, Springfield, Ohio's Big Four Station, razed in 1969 to make room for a highway bridge.
Metro: Once an effective transit system in the Washington, DC area; now no longer extant.
Station Aficionado
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:15 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby ExCon90 » Sat Sep 17, 2016 1:22 pm

From what I have read, the SP station at 3rd & Townsend was destroyed and its functions transferred one block west when 3rd St. was made one-way northbound and 4th St. one-way southbound. Previously, 3rd St. was a two-way major artery, and 4th St. was of only local importance--fortunately, since it cut right across the tracks and platforms. Only the shorter "commute" trains didn't block it. The Daylight (8.15 am and 6.00 pm) and the Lark (8.30 or 9.00 am arrival) completely blocked 4th St. during their entire dwell time, and the evening commute departures every 3 minutes from 5.14 to 5.32 pm meant that people knew not to drive on 4th St. between Townsend and King Sts. unless they absolutely had to. A traditional crossing guard complete with stop sign was all that stopped traffic. (Was this the only situation--it had to be rare--in which a major city street ran through an important terminal at track level? Not at the throat as at Milwaukee (MILW) or Troy, NY, but right across the platforms?) Clearly, if 4th St. was to become the only southbound route, that had to end.
ExCon90
 
Posts: 3437
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:22 pm

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby SemperFidelis » Sat Sep 17, 2016 2:05 pm

It wasn't much of a station, but the DL&W's Paterson Station on the old Boonton Line was demolished when the line was sacrificed for Interstate 80 and NJ Route 19. The station's site is somewhere under the grading for NJ Route 19.
SemperFidelis
 
Posts: 1297
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:49 pm
Location: Stupid Voterland

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby bdawe » Sat Sep 17, 2016 2:48 pm

Station Aficionado wrote:The west (at least the big cities--Canada and US) did better at holding on to its stations. The Great Northern Station in Vancouver, the original SP station in San Francisco and the CP and CN (pre-office tower) stations in Edmonton are major losses that come to mind, but I don't know if any of them were for highway/street construction.

Another midwestern example, Springfield, Ohio's Big Four Station, razed in 1969 to make room for a highway bridge.


Vancouver Great Northern Depot was demolished to avoid property taxes, after the city declined an offer of the structure. The lot has remained vacant for the last half-century, so no roads there, though lately the site has been identified for a new hospital. Third and Townsend in San Francisco did involve the removal of a grade crossing where 4th Street crossed all the station tracks, so that may have been part of the reasoning for cutting the terminal back a block and demolishing the 'temporary' terminal of 1914.
B. Dawe's map of routes and urban populations https://brendandawe.carto.com/viz/80b9d ... /embed_map NOW updated with 2016 Canadian Populations
User avatar
bdawe
 
Posts: 508
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2015 1:06 pm
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby Station Aficionado » Sat Sep 17, 2016 11:28 pm

Very interesting about the SP station in San Francisco. A lot of effort to move a station one block. But clearly was done to make things easier for cars.

In re Great Northern Depot in Vancouver, it was next door to what is now Pacific Central Station (which was the CN station). Amazing that the parcel is still vacant a half century on.

On another note, I have to further qualify my statement about major stations in the west of Canada. Calgary's CP station was replaced by the Calgary tower in the mid'60's, although a station remained at the bottom of the tower until VIA service ended in 1990. The Calgary CN station still stands, but CN was a much smaller player in Calgary, and its station paled in comparison with CP's.
Metro: Once an effective transit system in the Washington, DC area; now no longer extant.
Station Aficionado
 
Posts: 1686
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:15 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby bdawe » Sun Sep 18, 2016 4:46 am

Station Aficionado wrote:Very interesting about the SP station in San Francisco. A lot of effort to move a station one block. But clearly was done to make things easier for cars.


It was demolished in 1976 apparently, when the line was still in private SP ownership. May well have been a scheme to develop the real estate
B. Dawe's map of routes and urban populations https://brendandawe.carto.com/viz/80b9d ... /embed_map NOW updated with 2016 Canadian Populations
User avatar
bdawe
 
Posts: 508
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2015 1:06 pm
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby ExCon90 » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:33 pm

I think it qualifies as a true demolition to benefit vehicular traffic--after all, "nobody uses the trains anymore" (in the 70's). The site was used for some years after the demolition as an RV park, probably not worth the expense of building a completely new interlocking and a brand-new station. I have trouble believing that the SP paid for any part of that but got it at State expense as part of the one-way traffic project.
ExCon90
 
Posts: 3437
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:22 pm

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby dowlingm » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:52 pm

Ottawa arguably did worse to theirs - built a road through the tracks and put bureaucrats in the station...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governmen ... nce_Centre
dowlingm
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:42 pm
Location: Toronto, ON

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby R36 Combine Coach » Sun Sep 18, 2016 3:40 pm

Paterson, NJ - Lackawanna Boonton Line: closed 1963 and I-80 built on line. The Erie Main Line's stations in downtown Passaic were removed and replaced with widened street plazas.

NYCRR St. John's Park freight terminal, Manhattan: Holland Tunnel exit plaza built on site. New elevated freight terminal on "High Line" built 1934, ironically a Moses project.
Since my friend continues to chain smoke nonstop, she is probably an Alco.
User avatar
R36 Combine Coach
 
Posts: 4848
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 8:51 pm

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby Jeff Smith » Sun Sep 18, 2016 4:18 pm

Larchmont Station on the New Haven was lost to I-95 I believe. Rye may have been lost to it as well.
Next stop, Willoughby
~Jeff Smith (fka "Sarge") :: RAILROAD.NET Site Administrator
Jeff Smith
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7404
Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 9:28 am
Location: MP 67.2 Georgia Southern Railway

Re: Stations Lost to Highways or Streets

Postby bdawe » Sun Sep 18, 2016 5:30 pm

dowlingm wrote:Ottawa arguably did worse to theirs - built a road through the tracks and put bureaucrats in the station...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governmen ... nce_Centre


And the bureaucrats have steadfastly refused to give it back when asked.

That's the thing I find sad about Albany or Ottawa Union Stations - the obviously cared enough about passenger rail to build new stations in the 60s/70s, but they built them in the middle of suburban highway interchanges that annul one of the big benefits of train travel - getting you close to the center of things
B. Dawe's map of routes and urban populations https://brendandawe.carto.com/viz/80b9d ... /embed_map NOW updated with 2016 Canadian Populations
User avatar
bdawe
 
Posts: 508
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2015 1:06 pm
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia

Next

Return to General Discussion - Passenger Rail

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests