Selkirk hump to shut down?

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Re: Selkirk hump to shut down?

Postby Ironman » Fri May 19, 2017 3:01 pm

jbeckley68 wrote:Maybe a totally unrelated event, I noticed dump trucks unloading stone near the dead-ended class tracks at Dewitt?

Never see activity there?


Word is they will be block swapping in DeWitt also, in addition to Selkirk. I would guess that has something to do with what you saw.

As far as Selkirk goes, it's looking like the local yard is going to be the spot for the block swaps, but I don't think they've dropped stone yet.
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Re: Selkirk hump to shut down?

Postby Engineer Spike » Fri May 19, 2017 10:21 pm

The posts about what Hunter does are 100% correct. I saw the results as a BN, and CP employee. Many of the cuts are just a short term way, to save money, by deferring maintenance. Think of the price in scrap, by tearing everything up. Anything that isn't nailed down will be sold. CP has a section, of their website, for bidding on surplus equipment. You should have seen it under Hunter!

This is nothing new. Railroad historians just need to look at what Patrick McGinnis did to Boston and Maine. He told shareholders that he could make them more. Although B&M wasn't ever that profitable, the previous Edward French management team did a good job, of reinventing, in their operations. McGinnis then raped the B&M, just like Hunter has done at BN, IC, CN, CPR, and now CSX. It's the same game, only the names have changed.
"Boston and Maine Hudson River Bridge, westward track...no defects...... Boston and Maine Hudson River Bridge, westward track... no defects."
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Re: Selkirk hump to shut down?

Postby ExCon90 » Sat May 20, 2017 1:47 pm

And one of the characteristics of the railroad industry is that by its very nature you can cut out maintenance and capital expenditures for several years before the effects begin to show--all at once, in most cases. The trick seems to be to eliminate maintenance for a few consecutive summers, look like a hero, and--very important--don't wait too long to sell. Still, there seem to be plenty of investors who fall for the hype.
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